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'Please, stay with us': the best of Spectator readers' letters to Scottish voters

It's not about economics – it's about Britain, its values, and what might be destroyed if the country is snapped in two

13 September 2014

9:00 AM

13 September 2014

9:00 AM

At 9.30 p.m. last Saturday news broke that Scotland’s ‘yes’ campaign had established its first opinion poll lead. Since then, the country has been confronting the possibility of its impending dissolution. The vote will affect all 64 million people in the United Kingdom, and most have neither a vote, not a voice. Last weekend, The Spectator asked readers to submit letters to Scottish voters, saying why they are hoping for a ‘no’ vote. Those printed here are a small selection from the hundreds we received.

Strikingly, almost no one talks (as the ‘no’ campaign does) about the economic drawbacks of separation. No one who wrote to us claimed that Scotland could not go it alone, and no one seemed interested in the allure of ‘devo max’. They were concerned about Britain, its values, and what might be destroyed if the country were snapped in two.

As a patriotic Welshman, I understand some of the appeal of independence. Nothing would push me towards it more than the English media telling me it wasn’t possible, but Scotland doesn’t need to need to listen to the minority making such claims. Everyone I know in Wales is desperate for you to stay with us, precisely because of the success that Scotland has always brought to the union. I supported Celtic as a boy and lived in fear of ‘ten in a row’ in the late 1990s. I was introduced to classical music by Nicola Benedetti. When I pour myself a single malt on a Friday evening I swirl it in the glass and marvel at the most complex, sophisticated drink man has yet invented. And I like to feel that I have a stake in all of that. That it’s a part of my national identity.
I don’t care about the oil or the currency or the monarchy. It’s the people of Scotland who are its greatest asset, and if you leave Britain, we’ll be much the worse for it. Stay with us.
Damian Buckley, Cardiff

928I grew up in England as the descendant of immigrants. This had its rough edges. Racist graffiti seemed to be all over the place in the 1970s and some of the local children enjoyed ‘Paki bashing’. Knowing that my family was different, and not universally accepted, could have made it an unpleasant childhood.
Instead, I grew up feeling at home in Britain because I knew that differences were built into its character. Thanks to the Scots and their constant assertion of their own identity and values, Britain is not just one country. It is a ramshackle arrangement of four distinct countries. If there is room for the Scots, then there is room for me too. To be different is to be British — please, let’s keep it that way.
Andrew Apostolou, Whetstone, London

Dear Scottish voter, I write not to coerce nor beg but to tell you what you and your country means to me and many other people of these Isles. The ‘differences’ that separate us are superficial at best and cynical at worst; our bonds are not. Not once have I stepped off the train in Aviemore, or sat on a ridge in Glencoe, and considered myself away from home. I was just a little further from where my mail was normally sent. But I now look at the prospect of being forced — by some who view me as foreign — to view these lands (and you) as somewhat alien to myself. And what for? To face the same challenges, separately, that are common across our Isles. As far as the Union and my future is concerned, what’s mine is yours. Please stay.
Jo Simpson, west London

110.AmyJacksonOnce, I also dreamt of an independent Scotland, the master of its own destiny. I voted SNP, cheered Scotland and anyone opposing England. Then I moved to England in the late 1990s, as an ‘economic refugee’. To my discomfort, I found the English (aside from their annoying habit of calling Britain ‘England’) were just like us: worried about their kids’ education; lamenting summer weather; concerned with their own daily challenges; despairing of (and largely unrepresented by) their government. Now I fervently hope that Scotland will stay. Apart from anything else Scotland is the balance for the Union; the five million counterweight for the 60 million. The pricking conscience. The innovator. The socialist. The ballast.
Amy Jackson, Witney, Oxfordshire

Dear Scottish voter, We can’t blame you for feeling irritated with the ‘no’ campaign. We’ve been watching, and have cringed at their attempts to connect with you. We are painfully aware that many of them were spouting patronising tosh that would drive anyone into the slick, seductive nationalist camp. How many thousands of ‘Scots’ by heritage (myself included) now happen to be ‘English’ because of where our families now live? How ridiculous is it to separate two societies so deeply intertwined on the basis of the SNP’s ambitions? It’s your vote, but a ‘yes’ next Thursday would diminish us all. Long term, nobody wins. We’ll feel the most appalling sense of shock and sadness if you go. Please just say no.
Alex Brown, London

Those who revel in describing themselves as ‘English’ strike me as both parochial and small-minded. And yet now this is exactly what may be forced upon me through a process in which British people are denied any say. If a ‘yes’ vote passes, British people like me on both sides of the border will have to dismiss portions of our characters and look uncertainly to the future.
David Smith, East Yorkshire

102.TarekArabThe UK without Scotland would be a body without a heart. Scotland is not a satellite state, an occupied territory, an invaded country or a protectorate. She is already her own country with her own identity, culture, people and language. She’s an equal partner in the Union, subservient to no one. The history of the last three centuries is the history of a Union made great by Scotland’s presence. Yes, we can exist apart. But together, we are incredible. Let us remain united and continue to achieve greatness — as equals, friends and family.
Tarek Arab, west London

Although I’m British, I live and work in Russia. When I tell Russians that the break-up of the UK may be imminent, they are uniformly shocked and surprised. For them, you see, Britain is one of the world’s great success stories. Sometimes you need to live outside a country’s borders to see the big picture. No country has ever achieved a great destiny through separatism and division. Countries are great through unity — of that make no mistake. Please vote for the people of our islands to remain strong, prosperous and together.
Damon Hager

22.StewartFergusNationalism is an ugly force, accentuating and exaggerating minor differences, creating and exploiting perceived grievances. It’s worth pointing out that in the event of a ‘yes’ vote, it would be the fiduciary duty of the rump UK government to negotiate the absolute best deal for its taxpayers — which would mean no more favours to Scotland. The SNP will reap what they sow, but it is the ordinary British citizen who will ultimately lose out. We will all be diminished.
Stewart Fergus, South Croydon


Britain is a patchwork nation, with a patchwork soul and a patchwork people. My family, childhood, education, interests, what one might label identity, are a patchwork of Scottish and English strands. What binds these halves into one whole is Britishness — so hard to define, yet so easy to understand. Please don’t rip it apart. If you do, you will break my very British heart.
Alastair Benn, Cambridge

27.TomMcPhailThe ties that bind us together are not simply about whether you live north or south of a border. From Cornwall to Aberdeenshire, these islands are criss-crossed with more common interests, shared history and future prospects than can ever be divided by a line on a map. Alex Salmond is selling a myth: that Scotland is one single country and that the United Kingdom is nothing more than a Tory elite in Westminster. It’s not true. The Edinburgh fund manager and the Highland farmer — they may be Scottish but in truth they have less in common with each other than with their counterparts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. We can share our resources and we can share our ambitions. Don’t waste this opportunity. Please vote ‘no’.
Tom McPhail, Bristol

4.TomCalvardYes, there is a widening inequality and poverty within and across our society. A lack of social mobility at almost every turn. So why emphasise further division across these problems that affect almost all of us? The problems — a political class, a weakened democracy, abridgment of freedom in the name of order — will still remain. A union is better placed to make peaceful protest, signify pluralist living and aspirations to things bigger — much bigger — than ourselves.
Tom Calvard, Edinburgh

It is the differences between us that put the ‘great’ into Great Britain. I consider the Scots to be nothing more than my family. Sitting here, writing this, thinking of what might happen in a few days time feels like death. A death of a family member. Please, Scotland, stay with us.
Angele Tornabene-Parsons, Eastbourne

155. Tim PooleInverness was my home until April this year. My accent was different but I never felt like a foreigner — and to me, that is what it is to be British: being from a far distant part of our islands, speaking differently, but somehow still being at home. The Union is a common bond between our people. If I was still working in Scotland, I’d want my son to be raised in a place called Great Britain, where people from all over our island continue to share this common bond of togetherness and friendship. Why give it up now?
Tim Poole, Beckenham, Kent

29.UrsulaBuchanThe myriad threats to the Scottish economy of this leap in the dark have been pointed out. But I’m even more worried about the cultural and social sidelining of Scotland which will inevitably happen after independence. Many in the rest of the UK will be so upset by this unilateral severance, this ‘turning of backs’, that they will be strongly tempted to turn their own backs. The richness of the Scottish contribution to our Union over the past centuries will count less and less to them. Will a sense of pure nationhood truly compensate for that isolation? I wonder.
Ursula Buchan, Glapthorn East Northamptonshire

We Scottish voters have heard the ‘yes’ campaign talk about the perils of conservatism, and how a vote for independence would ensure a Tory-free Scotland. And yes, there’s a fair chance of that. But I also care about my brothers and sisters in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and London. I don’t want to leave them behind at the mercy of conservatism and austerity. That’s why I urge my fellow Scots to summon that British spirit: vote ‘no’ to separation on next week. Leave no man behind: we’re better together.
Chris Scott, East Kilbride

69.JamesHutchingsI am a ‘yes’ kind of person, and so understand the pull towards a ‘yes’ vote. But here’s the paradox: a ‘yes’ vote will lead to a rejection — in reality a ‘no’ — to all that has held us together for so long. Like you may feel, I often despair as I hear about the latest policy from Westminster, and yes, we can make our country so much better still, but surely that is not a reason for a once-and-for-all separation? Please stay!
Revd James Hutchings
Priest-in-charge, Littleham-cum–Exmouth
with Lympstone Mission

I may not come from Scottish stock, but I have always counted Scotland’s heroes as my heroes, Scotland’s history as my history and my Scottish friends as my countrymen. I’ve always been immensely proud to come from the land of David Hume and Francis Bacon, Robert Burns and William Shakespeare, William Wallace and Winston Churchill. Scotland, we love your history, your people and your potential. Please don’t leave.
Oliver Lewis, Camberley, Surrey

Dear Scottish voter, I sometimes wonder if Britain understands how much her island’s story means to those abroad. The Union has contributed so much to the destiny of humanity. When civilisation hung in the balance, and the shadow of Nazism fell over Europe, the world looked to the solitary figure of Britannia. The peoples of her islands confronted the Luftwaffe together, not apart. Young British men of the four nations lie side by side in Normandy, having pledged the ultimate love for their land. Many of us cannot understand why something so beautiful should be destroyed.
Timothy Spyrou, Limassol, Cyprus

153. Richard KeatleyYes, our current political and economic challenges are serious, frustrating and divisive — but they are temporary. Independence is permanent and irreversible. Real change comes slowly, as it always has, through the determined efforts of men and women working together to break down barriers, build consensus and make common cause. That is the direction of human progress, and it is what the United Kingdom, for all its failings, stands for. The Union is one of Scotland’s greatest achievements — to leave will greatly diminish you, and us.
Richard Keatley, Pulborough, West Sussex

My dear Scotland, I heard you want a divorce so I thought I would write you a letter to tell you what I know about divorces. There’s no such thing as an amicable split, because neither side is ever happy with the divorce settlement. This is the second characteristic of divorce: both end up poorer than they were before but often they don’t realise this until it is too late.

24.AndrewJacksonI know that you have been seeing Norway. It must seem an exciting prospect to be with someone new. But England is here on same island, right next to you. She has been loyal and dependable and is willing to rebuild the relationship. Scotland, it’s time to come home.
Andrew Jackson, Ormskirk,  Lancashire

I would love, in my dreams, to have an independent Kent. Think of the tariffs on the roads, the near monopoly on hops, our recourse to oast houses, castles, beaches, Dickens, William Harvey, Canterbury, Knole for tourism… I tell friends from eastern Europe and the US to stay in Kent because we’ve everything about these islands within an hour’s drive. So go — if you must. Kent will follow you. Our island will be snipped up into bits.
Charles Robinson, Kent

I have a passion: I love flying. And here’s the thing. From the cockpit, the UK isn’t very big on a worldwide scale. Actually, it’s not very big at all. Scotland is even smaller. I climb to 5,000 feet from central Scotland and I can see England. The nationalists want to put up barriers on something that is not very big to start with. Have they ever flown? What is this madness to split up something that is not very big, and put up barriers where none currently exist?
Lindsay Knight, Blairgowrie, Perthshire

77.LeighHigginsLast weekend, I attended a commemoration of the 70th anniversary of Arnhem in Somerby, Leicestershire, where the 10th Battalion Parachute Regiment were stationed. One of the veterans came down from his home in Scotland. Upon the parade through the village we had heard the 51st Highlanders on the bagpipes. Scottish pipes, in an English village for a British cause.
Leigh Higgins, Twyford, Leicestershire

I may have some Scottish blood in my veins, but I live down south so I’m not allowed a say. It feels like my whole identity is being taken away from me. Though a virulent Eurosceptic, I’d even stay in the EU if that was the price of keeping you with us!
Oliver Knox, St Lawrence, Jersey

113.MatthewLumbyDear Scotland, Listening to the ‘yes’ camp, you’d think England is full of Ukip–supporting, Scotland-hating loons. You might think hating the Conservative party is a reason to start a new nation, but guess what? Most of the rest of the UK hates them too. They haven’t won an election for 22 years. That poll tax business? We hated it too — hated it so much that we got rid of it. And the prime minister behind it.
Most of us love Scotland. We love being part of this Union. Say yes to the UK, and vote ‘no’.
Matthew Lumby, Chester

Leaving the UK is akin to walking out of an extraordinary home you have built (and own) and then throwing away the keys.
Charles Watters, Canterbury, Kent

Churchill once proclaimed that, ‘Of all the small nations of this earth, perhaps only the ancient Greeks surpass the Scots in their contribution to mankind.’
I have no doubt that he’d affirm that this is only the case as a consequence of the Act of Union. Yes, some say the Union’s time has come and that impersonal economic forces have diminished our nation. But always remember:

We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are

Rule Britannia! I say, and to quote the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards at Waterloo (the most British of all battles), ‘Scotland Forever!’
Oliver Simmonds, Worthing, Sussex

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Show comments
  • Clotsworth

    Dear England.

    I, a committed YES voter are most grateful for your concern and kind words but perplexed to find such misplaced sorrow.

    Scotland is not going to be lost, closed, or even foreign if you choose to come and live here.

    Scotland shall merely cease the warmongering poodle role so beloved of UK politicians, rid our land of the repugnant filth that despoils the Clyde and mocks the beauty of life and all creation, and divert some of the fruits of our labour, resources and the freedoms that all of our ancestors fought for to the peaceful propagation of the common weal in Scotland/

    You remember, that which we used to have, pre Thatcher and which Westminster has so contemptuously stolen from all in these Isles and handed on a plate to foreign corporate interests to make us slaves in our own lands, unable even to aspire to be able to afford a home let alone raise a family on the average wage.

    So please, for all our sakes,let us take this unique, perhaps never to be repeated chance to establish the sovereignty of the people, to snatch back our destiny from whence it was stolen by an unconstrained Parliament that , entirely without warrant declared itself sovereign,( stole the divine right of the King to rule in the name of the people) and join us in the world of peaceful nations, England, as a free people, sovereign in your own land, beholden to no one, not wanting to punch any weight, let alone sacrifice your future so that a miserable treacherous political class can play power politics on the world stage, to no end, apart from the promulgation of war and the utter evil of thermonuclear weapons.

    Taken together, the Kingdoms of Scotland and England have nothing to fear, as cyphers of the UK, we are beggared and damned, until, at last, we punch once too often above our weight, and life be obliterated on these isles, a legitimate target in a world of paranoia and nuclear armed states.

    I shall vote YES for Scotland, i hope you will come round.

    Love to all,

    Colin Thomasson.

    • Fenton!

      So what this really about is Leftism. Hoisting the Red flag. Pathetic, unworthy, and dangerous.

  • Liz

    What a pity the Scots have nothing but contempt for “English bastards”.

  • Liz

    That guy who grew up in England seeing racist graffiti targeting people like him, so did I – I grew up in Scotland.

  • Caps Lock

    “Those who revel in describing themselves as ‘English’ strike me as both parochial and small-minded.” David Smith, East Yorkshire. If this sort of Rubbish is the best the Spectator can come up with then no wonder the Scots want away. So do those who revel in describing themselves as ‘Scottish’ strike you as both parochial and small-minded Mr Smith? Or Welsh? Or Irish? If I was Scottish I would vote to get away from idiots like you!!

  • global city

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/scottish-independence/11087302/Scots-wont-get-independence-from-a-Yes-vote.html

    The obvious flaws in Salmond’s promises are not being exploited by the Better Together folk…..I wonder why they would not use this fantastic ammo?

  • Chris McLaughlin

    “I may have some Scottish blood in my veins, but I live down south so I’m not allowed a say. It feels like my whole identity is being taken away from me. Though a virulent Eurosceptic, I’d even stay in the EU if that was the price of keeping you with us!
    Oliver Knox, St Lawrence, Jersey”

    Jersey isn’t in the UK either, I look forward to your abandoning of self-governance and tax-exile status in order to rejoin us all in remote Westminster rule.

    • kefp

      And threatened to declare UDI if the UK signed up to EU savings tax.

  • Chris McLaughlin

    Interesting that as far as I could see hardly a one of these contributors could find a reason why it is in SCOTLAND’S interests to stay. Instead, they were all selfish reasons why it was important for THEM that we stayed. Illustrates the defects of the Union perfectly.

    • English Majority

      Don’t worry. These ‘English’ people who’ve wrote these letters are the minority.

      The vast majority of native English want you to leave, or couldn’t care less.

    • UKSteve

      What a spectacularly, breathtakingly, astonishingly stupid thing you have written. “As far as you could see” ? You need a new “optician” old matey, because you’re as myopic as they come.

      Many people- if you bother to read them, like me they seem to say it’s in no-one’s interests to separate. Less than a month before this crucial and irreversible vote, you’ve no idea what currency is even going to be available to you, much less which you will end up using. How insane is that?

      I don’t think any amount of re-reading of these fine messages above would make any difference, because you’re so parochial, mean-spirited and narrow-minded and intorspective, it wouldn’t do you any good, and I’m beginning to wonder if people like English Majority have a point.

      Addendum: I note you’ve even up-voted your own post; illustrates the intellectual paucity of your case magnificently.

      • Chris McLaughlin

        1. If you can find a reason proffered as to why its in Scotland’s interests to stay in the Union among all the arse-wash above then feel free to quote it.
        2. The currency will be the pound, it’s the only game in town at least in the short term. There may be a currency union, there may not be, it won’t make much difference either way. All the states which have dumped Westminster government did this for at least the first few years.
        3. As for being narrow minded etc. – you know nothing about me or my motivations, and the fact you seem so comfortable making stereotypical generalizations about 5 million of the people you supposedly want to remain as your fellow citizens might tell you something about why we’ve got to where we are.

        • UKSteve

          1) Well, “arse-wash” gives you away, if nothing you’ve typed before fails to. And it doesn’t – cumulative effect. That and up-voting your own posts – hilarious.

          2) A typical response. Who said you can have the pound? For as long as the pound is your currency, you’ll be monetarily and fiscally beholden to the Bank of England, which is governed in….errrr….London.

          3) I judge you by what you write, and everything I have said stands. What I said didn’t apply to “5 million” (it’s actually 5.4 million). You want separation and self determination, the key to which is your own currency, and you haven’t a clue as to how to go about it. How spectacularly inept. You glibly and arrogantly state “the pound”, but the SNP leadership is slavering to join the EU – and you will be forced to join the euro.

          I saw Nicola Sturgeon in the debate last night – she was effing abysmal. If you split, you will perish. Nigel Farage said it best today.

          • Chris McLaughlin

            1. It is arse-wash.

            2. We can use the pound if we like. Only a formal currency union requires any kind of agreement. The Isle of Man, Jersey, Gibraltar all use the pound sans such an agreement as did Ireland, Australia et all did in the past. Maybe you should read this from a good right-wing source – http://order-order.com/2014/09/13/currency-options-for-a-free-scotland/

            3. Thanks for telling me the population of the country I’ve lived in almost all my life; obviously you know far more about it than me. In actual fact the currency isn’t that important. Brent crude is traded in US dollars so whether the pound is in use or not makes no difference to that part of the economy. The extent to which a currency contributes to sovereignty is at the very least up for debate. Currency values are of most significance if you have an economy with plenty of manufacturing or agriculture, where the relative value of currencies affects prices in export markets. In a service-heavy economy (like rUK or iScotland) currency values are far less significant. Also it is extremely doubtful how “sovereign” states are with regard to the value of their currency. With perhaps the exception of the US dollar, the
            Renminbi and perhaps the Euro, the value of the currency is determined by the foreign exchange markets, not the state. Norman Lamont threw the entire weight of the UK Treasury (£27 billion pounds worth) into trying to prop up the pound on the Forex markets in 1992, raising interest rates twice in a day – and still and failed spectacularly. Since then the volume of the Forex markets has increased exponentially. The degree to which the UK is “sovereign” over its currency is highly doubtful.

          • UKSteve

            I advise against randomly cutting and pasting from sources that attempt to support your view – which is called confirmation bias.

            I know about the interest rates 5% in one day – they affected me. I have said all my life we should hold on to the pound, this was an experiment with the single currency.

            “….obviously you know far more about it than me.” It seems so.

            But why you arrogantly assume you can just amble on with the pound is beyond me. You cite Guiido, which I read earlier, and compare a separate Scotland to the Isle of Man and Jersey. Now that’s some “arse-wash” – same sized economy are you? Diversity? Complexity?

            “The extent to which a currency contributes to sovereignty is at the very least up for debate.” Errr, no, not really, and what the F has this to do with a separate Scotland? You would still be completely tied to Westminster, fiscally and monetary, and no amount of disjointed rubbish off the internet – that you clearly don’t understand – can counter that.

          • Chris McLaughlin

            It’s hardly “randomly cutting and pasting from sources ” if it addresses precisely the question you raise.

            Thanks for telling me about confirmation bias, I hadn’t heard about in during the course of any of my three university degrees, so you’ll have to forgive me for being one of those North Britons too stupid to govern myself. I profoundly apologize for my intellectual deficiencies and thank Jesus you and your Unionist pals are here to educate me on such matters, in not at all a presumptive and arrogant manner. How’s that attitude working out for you in terms of preserving your precious Union, by the way?

            By the way “Errr, no, not really” is a superb analysis of my argument. Well done. I’m deeply impressed by your grappling with the nuances of my case.

      • alexicon

        Pound.

    • Phil T Tipp

      Precisely, the vote is for Scots to have a crack at self-determination. The unionists snivelling like their Scottish boyfriend has walked out don’t seem to get this. It’s not you, it’s me – I’ve changed. Goodbye. And don’t call me. lol. YES for a new start.

  • AJH1968

    I cannot
    imagine any of Salmond or Sturgeons ancestors being present at the Battle of
    Bannockburn. If they were it was most likely that they were slinging haggis and
    gruel in the kitchens, or raising their skirts for the lusty Jocks. I also
    suspect then, as is now their wares were overvalued and of little quality or
    merit. And to the nasty Scots on this thread we don’t hate you we just feel
    desperately sorry for you (not unlike a red headed step child), to the Loyal
    Scot God Bless (sincerely).

  • Jose Martins

    I dream with a Scottish independence that triggers the fall of the City of London which in turn leads to the implosion of the whole Cthulhu financial system.
    I dream with a Scottish independence that triggers other European regions referendums and starts the beheading of the Medusa European Union.

    I also have another (bad) dream where a yes vote ends up irrelevant like the French and Dutch referendums.

    • studio1972

      You need to go back on the meds, London would be stronger with Scotland gone, as all the banks will move south.

      • alexicon

        Name one that will move south?

  • English Majority

    You really are total Establishment aren’t you, Spectator.

    I thought you were a bit different, but you’re not.

    The entire Establishment have sprung their rancid legs into motion to stop Scottish Independence, and you dutifully fall into line.

    You’re also liars. The fact is that most English don’t care, AT ALL, if Scotland leaves. But you’ve given this fact zero coverage.

    Add in the sinister Alex Massie article, in which he spoke of his pride that England was becoming non-White, and generally displayed his visceral hatred of the native English people, and it becomes pretty clear what the Spectator has become.

    • FootLong

      The EU wants Scotland to stay in the UK. What does that tell us..

      • Noa

        Not much, other than that they don’t want another economic basket case like Cyprus or Greece to support, at present.
        But their golden rule remains ‘Divide and Conquer”.

        • FootLong

          No, they don´t want to divide and conquer, the want a European super state. Like all socialists they are dreaming of a global super state and world government. A No by the Scots would strengthen the centrifugal forces within Europe. Catalonia would be next.

          • Gwangi

            Except that most in Catalonia in favour of independence are middle class, well-educated and relatively rich.
            Most YES votes in Scotland are the dregs of Caledonia – unemployed and unemployable, drunken, semi-literate – society’s losers who have nothing to lose. The same mob voted in old Adolf back I the day…

          • FootLong

            I am not arguing your point. All I am saying is that the EU wants Scotland to stay in the Union. The people that voted for Hitler were mostly “petit bourgeois” I would think and not the lowest echelons of the ladder

        • alexicon

          Don’t worry we’ll help out England.

          • Gwangi

            You won’t be able to – you’ll just be a b-tch of the EU, under the leash of Germany via Brussels.
            Independence? LOL! This is just a racist anti-English YES campaigners vote. Each Scot would be 40% poorer if the vote is YES. And Scotland’d soon be an EU whoor, with sneaky slimeball Salmond – the Murdoch lobbyist – serving his masters like a little renttboy beeetch!

    • RadioJockhadistan

      Farage was right all along – the LibLabCon, the biased BBC, the centralist press, the Westminster elite – none of them can be trusted. The above and many others are campaigning to sell or selling out Britain. They are importing record number of immigrants, first by Labour, now Boris Johnson wants the Chinese to come next.

      The treacherous LibLabCon are totally unreliable – in the coming days, do not believe a word they say without questioning the detail. Apply Chomsky and note what they are not saying in order to perpetuate their obvious and repeat lies.

  • English Majority

    In regards to the awful, weak, middle class Leftist, Tom Holland: Have you seen his Twitter?

    He daily, grotesquely misrepresents the English people to further his own creepy agenda.

    He daily tells the Scottish people that the “English people desperately wants Scotland to say No to Independence”, when in fact, the English people wants Scotland to leave, or literally don’t care less either way.

    Tom Holland urgently needs to remember that he speaks for HIMSELF only.

    • Paul W

      You could not be more wrong, YOU sir, speak for yourself, with your vitriol. The majority of English people want Scotland to remain; they know we are stronger together. I suggest that you get out of your isolation and talk to people. I am English, but I am also incredibly proud to be British with all that we have given the world. Your debased insults of Tom Holland, someone who actually speaks up for the English people show you for who you are. If Scotland leaves the UK the whole economy will suffer, English people recognise this, or rather those that live in the real world. But it is more than the economy, it is our cultural ties and history. Yet you are as bad the Cyber Nats, pouring abuse on those with principal and pursuing a noble endeavour such as this collection of letters from people across the UK. You do NOT speak for the English.

      • English Majority

        Ah, articulate passion.

        Yet, so false and incorrect.

  • jamesbarn

    Posterity will never see a bigger con than this
    The powers promised to the Scotch aren’t worth a pot of piss
    Camerons referendum pledge like Gordons Lisbon call
    And Cleggs promise on Uni fees are simply worth FUCK ALL

  • FootLong

    “Thanks to the Scots and their constant assertion of their own identity and values, Britain is not just one country. It is a ramshackle arrangement of four distinct countries. If there is room for the Scots, then there is room for me too. To be different is to be British — please, let’s keep it that way.” Andrew Apostolou.

    If this is his reason why Scotland should stay, then the Scottish should say Yes.

    A Greek thinking he had anything in common with Pakistanis. I hope they aren´t eyeing his daughters.

  • Malcolm McCandless

    Wee Ginger Dug, “Davie Cameron came to Scotland to do his impression of an abandoned puppy telling us that independence is for life not just for Christmas. Poor Davie with the hangdog eyes told us he was going to be heartbroken and tried to make us feel guilty. Meanwhile Boris Johnson and half the Tory back bench are standing by a canal with a sack, a stack of bricks, and looking impatient.”

    http://weegingerdug.wordpress.com/2014/09/11/fat-cats-and-hangdog-looks/

    As you say to us, we now say to you – “No Thanks”

    • Fenton!

      You have plenty. This isn’t about what you have, it’s what you’re willing to stand up for. Which ought to have an eye on civilization, and your place as its bulwark.

  • Stephen Brown

    Sorry Speccy, the Scots have had enough and are off. You can’t just tell us how much you love us while we are walking out the door, should have been done a long time a go. We have tv and internet up here you know, so we can see the contempt for us first hand, tchau, salut, arivaderci and goodbye

    • Nullian

      You won’t be missed.

  • rtj1211

    I”m not sure I agree that Britain allows you to be different. It does, as long as you get paid a pittance and do what your betters tell you too.

    They’re not your betters, that’s the problem: they are more aggressive, more selfish and more self-centred. They are more empire-loving, they are more hierarchically obsessed, they are more dictatorial and they are more controlling.

    My whole life has been others telling me what to want, what to think, what to feel, who to marry, who not to work for, what political views are acceptable. All in aggressive, self-righteous, threatening tones. And then all claimed to be as nothing, considering only their own rhinoceros-arse-like character rather than the effect it had on me.

    That’s not the right to be different in Britain, that’s ‘do as you’re told or else’.

    Maybe in 50 years Britain will truly be emancipated.

    It certainly isn’t yet, no matter what rubbish the media spouts about persecution complexes.

  • kefp

    No-one asked me … and here’s one English reader hoping for a yes vote.

    • UKSteve

      Everyone was asked, it was on the website. But this doesn’t surprise me, and anyone who thinks a Yes vote is a good idea hasn’t thought anything through about the consequences – for both sides of Hadrian’s Wall.

    • alexicon

      We have something in common.

  • Colin

    Echo’s of the grauniad campaign to write to American voters, urging them to “do the right thing” and not vote for Dubya. How did that work out?

    • Fenton!

      No comparison. The Guardian is… the Guardian. What more need be said?

  • Liz

    “The UK without Scotland would be a body without a heart. ”

    Charming.

  • “https://spectator.com.au/stay”

    Link is broken … not working!

  • Nullian

    Why would England want to keep living with its mad wife in the attic?

  • Jenny_Tells

    What is so precious about the Union anyway? The political establishment wants to keep it as it hates anything that could rock their cosy little boat. Others want to keep it through mawkish sentimentality for our “national heritage”. Well, in the last 20 years, this country has changed beyond all recognition, and not for the better. If the Scots feel that they would have a better deal with independence, this is their opportunity of a lifetime.

    You can’t give people “democracy” then squeal when they take you up on the offer, which seems to be what the MSM is doing. The fact is that if a No vote were successful, the SNP would not accept defeat. It would still be campaigning for independence, spurred on by the knowledge that half of Scotland still wants it. So Holyrood would be a constant thorn in the side of Westminster. It would be agitating for another referendum, wanting yet more powers to be transferred, and demanding a disproportionately larger slice of the UK’s tax revenues. A Yes vote would be the best possible outcome for all concerned. We can but hope.

    • Chris McLaughlin

      The Union is already mortally wounded. The referendum result will merely reveal how imminent will be the final demise. The best result for everyone is a clean break, because it’s clear this isn’t over even with a not vote. There will be more devolution, more divergence, and unless the “English question” is resolved more ill feeling too. The Union’s dead, it’s been dead for a while, it’s time to move on.

  • Noa

    Scotland. Please. Stay.
    Scotland please, Stay?
    Scotland! Please stay…
    Scotland please? Stay!
    Salmond please, waiter!
    Stay please? Salmond!

    Oi! England! Do you want to be a member of a club which doesn’t want you to be a member?

    • RadioJockhadistan

      Answer on a postcard by 2017.

      2017?
      2 0 1 7 ?
      Twenty seventeen?

      And only if.
      Only if what?
      What if only?
      If only we could believe what the LibLabCon come out with.

  • aurila

    everybody I know wants Scotland to go

    • Fenton!

      Well, you don’t know me then. Or Sir David Attenborough, Mick Jagger, Elton John….

    • Fenton!

      Well, you don’t know me then. Or Sir David Attenborough, Mick Jagger, Elton John….

  • Phil T Tipp

    Woohoo! See yese aw much, much later! Stop greetin, we arnae. Tattie bye!

  • Chris McLaughlin

    Here’s a simple question for all you rUK readers: How many of you would vote to keep the current Westminster system if the ballot was put in front of you to abolish it? I suspect that even in England Westminster would struggle to win majority support. So is it really so surprising we are where we are? The main difference between Scotland and England is that Scotland has the political tools and institutions effect precisely this rejection. Government in general is deeply, deeply broken in the UK, and the problem doesn’t stop at Gretna. It’s just we have other issues around which these forces of dissent can coalesce. If there is a “No” vote, it’s likely to be a narrow one, and if you really care so much about the Union there there has to be a proper, comprehensive constitutional convention with EVERYTHING on the table i.e. written constitution, proportional representation, elected upper house, federalized government for the nations. Anything else WILL fail and we’ll be back for round two in 15 years when some more of the dwindling cohorts of geriatric Scottish Unioinsts will be dead and a “Yes” vote inevitable.

  • Fenton!

    So touching. What wonderful letters.

    The Scots must stay because really, once you leave you can never go back again. It’s that way with romantic relationships, and with everything. Be very sure you want the break because you will have to accept it later, even when it’s sad and you have regrets. Best thing is not to do it.

  • Fenton!

    So touching. What wonderful letters.

    The Scots must stay because really, once you leave you can never go back again. It’s that way with romantic relationships, and with everything. Be very sure you want the break because you will have to accept it later, even when it’s sad and you have regrets. Best thing is not to do it.

    • alexicon

      No regrets. Bye.

      • Fenton!

        Of course you don’t have regrets! You haven’t done it yet. And may not, as I hope. The regret comes later when you realize that it wasn’t wise.

  • English Majority

    Gh

  • minnesoter

    Is it true that Scotland is more PC/MC than England? This is what I am reading. I guess maybe the whole Braveheart thing was oversold? You people do realize that you are being hollowed out from within by New Boys, Come from the East, who have nothing but contempt for your centuries-old — nay!, millenial-old — native culture, don’t you? What does their culture have, that your culture doesn’t? I just don’t get it.

  • alexicon

    What a load of twaddle. The intro said it all for me here.
    Tell my Spectator. How do you get 2 countries inside 1 country?

  • alexicon

    Pass the sick bag please.

  • alexicon

    Does Oliver S

  • Douglaswinwon

    The English rebuffed a church that wanted an equal say in Government and was Britain’s largest landowner; that sold absolution and blackmailed with threats of excommunication and eternal damnation.
    They curtailed the powers of Monarchy and made them answerable to the people by
    widening the vote and strengthening law through parliament. They founded the navy that was to become the worlds most powerful and opened trading posts throughout the world
    .
    Then came the Union. Tinder and spark are vastly different but only when they are fused together can they reach their full potential and create a living entity, greater than the separate parts.The people of these Isles patently managed to do that too!

    The positives that followed were manifold but chiefly;we widened the right to vote , restricted child labour, banished slavery, introduced trade unions, public schooling and formed the NHS. BUT the 300 year old Union’s task isn’t over yet and its need is as vital as at any time in its history.
    There is a requirement to reform parliament, to make it truly representative of the concerns of its citizens.
    We need to end the cosy political voting system that allows safe seats and promotes traditional voting from unaware conformists regardless of manifesto.
    To make parliament defend British citizens from those who do not share these Islands aims nor believe in free speech, democracy and secularism. Who change our society to such an extent that the former would not recognise the present.
    Its a new dawn because of instant communications and pressure groups with coordinated actions.An informed electorate determined to curb unfettered capitalism, impose just taxes and distribute wealth more fairly.
    We need to stay together, lead the way and finish the job!

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    “Freedom and Whisky Gang Thegither”, Robert Burns, Scottish poet.

  • Douglaswinwon

    The English rebuffed a church that wanted an equal say in Government and was Britain’s largest landowner; that sold absolution and blackmailed with threats of excommunication and eternal damnation.
    They curtailed the powers of Monarchy and made them answerable to the people by
    widening the vote and strengthening law through parliament. They founded the navy that was to become the worlds most powerful and opened trading posts throughout the world
    .
    Then came the Union. Tinder and spark are vastly different but only when they are fused together can they reach their full potential and create a living entity, greater than the separate parts.The people of these Isles patently managed to do that too!

    The positives that followed were manifold but chiefly;we widened the right to vote , restricted child labour, banished slavery, introduced trade unions, public schooling and formed the NHS. BUT the 300 year old Union’s task isn’t over yet and its need is as vital as at any time in its history.
    There is a requirement to reform parliament, to make it truly representative of the concerns of its citizens.
    We need to end the cosy political voting system that allows safe seats and promotes traditional voting from unaware conformists regardless of manifesto.
    To make parliament defend British citizens from those who do not share these Islands aims nor believe in free speech, democracy and secularism. Who change our society to such an extent that the former would not recognise the present.
    Its a new dawn because of instant communications and pressure groups with coordinated actions.An informed electorate determined to curb unfettered capitalism, impose just taxes and distribute wealth more fairly.
    We need to stay together, lead the way and finish the job!

  • Gwangi

    Britain is a tiny island – and the Chinese people I spoke to at the weekend all thought the Scottish were mad even to be having a vote for independence’ (so-called but in reality just breaking up one fair, enriching, successful union with England to become a very small and minor partner of another – the EU). China is over 1 billion people and has its regions and ethnic minorities BUT it stays together for the collective good.

    If you want prosperity, unity, harmony and success, vote NO. If you want patriotic poverty, sectarian violence, one party socialist statehood and hatred vote YES.

    Those Chinese have now cancelled a visit to Scotland next month – I showed them the abusive posts by the YES campaign on Twitter and they decided to visit Wales instead to avoid any racism and violence.

    Scotland is behaving like a truculent teenager, which just shows how immature and cackhanded so-called independence would be. They want to leave home BUT still want their pocket money, use of the parental car, free washing and food services.

    How hilariously adolescent! NO Scotland – you leave you get NO pound, no UK defence jobs, NO access of OUR business contacts, NO subsidy, NO cheap food and postal rates subsidised by English and Welsh taxpayers.

    Also, can we PLEASE send back Fiona Bruce and all the other members of the BBC Scottish Raj? And all Scottish MPS can F off too – even if the vote is NO. Get ready Scotland for a backlash.

    • Paul Bethune

      An article urging Scots to stay in the UK and this is your offering? F****** beautiful. (Liking your own comments too, how weird)

  • jmckba

    Toryboy “I say David, how did you get on with that scottish problem?”
    David “Oh that’s all sorted now”
    Toryboy “What do you mean David?”
    David “Well, we just made up a lot of scary stories then told them I Ioved them”
    Toryboy “That’s all?”
    David “Yes, and the damn fools believed them”
    Toryboy “That calls for a drink, David” “What would you like?”
    David “I think scotch would be appropriate”
    David “You know, I believe the NO vote could get us re-elected in 2015”
    Toryboy “How so David”
    David “Well, we will be seen as the heroes who rescued the union”
    Toryboy “Jolly good David”
    David “The silly thing is….. we can’t even thank the jocks for helping us”

  • Wendy George

    It seems to me that the “yes” voters have selective amnesia. They come across as wanting “independence” (but run by the EU) from Tory government. Have they forgotten the 13 years of Labour, headed by 2 Scots, who bankrupted the country? Never mind the fact that the Tory’s had the most votes in England, nullified by the unfair boundaries, during that time. Do the Scots really want a one party state, socialism at all costs?

    It’s about time we got rid of the Barnet Formula and the West Lothian question and put the politics on a more even keel. Give England her own Parliament and have a small council of ministers responsible for the Union, or what is left of it after the Scots leave. And, please, let’s have some hard headed negotiations in either event. David Cameron is not the man for the job.

  • LordJustin

    The one thing I have learned about politics in my …ahem… years on this planet is that, if all of our politicians unanimously embrace a single position “in the national interest”, the lies are about to start flowing thick and fast. The Scottish question is a perfect example.

    The politicians want to maintain the union so as not to diminish their personal power and influence in the UK, EU and NATO, and to maintain the wealth of their sponsors. If the people (UK not just Scotland) have any sense, they will support separation precisely for that reason. It will make the political Elite at least a little more accountable to – and respectful of – the rest of us.

  • Terry Field

    England has only occupied Scotland for 307 years to ensure it acts as a buffer state to frustrate invasion of the Home Counties by the barbarians from the Shetlands.

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