James Delingpole

From teapots to rare meat, my Britain is becoming a lost country

People of my generation and older are increasingly doomed to feel like strangers in a politically correct land

28 March 2015

9:00 AM

28 March 2015

9:00 AM

There was a letter to the Daily Telegraph last weekend which depressed me more than anything I’ve read in ages. It reported the visit by a social worker to an elderly woman who made her a cup of tea. The young social worker was shocked by what she saw. Not only did this bewildered old woman insist on using leaves rather than a bag but she first poured some hot water into the pot, swirled it round, then wasted it by putting it straight down the sink. Here, clearly, was evidence that grandma was incapable of looking after herself and should be put into care immediately.

This put me in mind of another experience I had recently. I was having dinner with a group of friends in an upmarket London pub and we all wanted our burgers cooked medium rare. ‘They won’t allow it,’ said a local friend in the know. ‘We’re under Westminster Council jurisdiction, here.’ Sure enough, when the time to order came we had to beg and plead with the manager for our burgers not be overcooked, as local health laws now require.

It also reminded me of my recent adventures with my dentist, a clearly bright, well-spoken girl in her twenties of, I’m guessing, Pakistani extraction. She obviously knows all her stuff but I can’t stand her. The problem is that she has the most appalling dental-chair-side manner. She’s officious, patronising, fully bought-into the NHS programme, whereby every patient is a statistic rather than a real person. It seems never to have occurred to her that the way you address an educated, middle-aged country gent might need to be slightly different from the way, say, you speak to a porcine 15-year-old chav.

Also, she gives off these truly horrible politically correct vibes. Some of the most interesting and enjoyable conversations of my life are the ones I have with people of different races and cultures about where they come from and how the world looks from their perspective.


For example, the other day, coming back from Naples in Florida to Miami airport I had the most amazing chat — so good that I recorded it on my iPhone — with a black Caribbean naturalised American. He told me how he and his fellow black Caribbean émigrés absolutely hated being called ‘black Americans’ because he considered black Americans to be no-good welfare scroungers, whereas his own lot, he insisted — he was originally from Dominican Republic — were incredibly hard workers who just wanted to get on, and simply couldn’t be doing with the identity politics game.

‘What, all Caribbeans? What about the Jamaicans?’ I asked. My friend explained the tragedy of the Jamaicans: that they used to be the hardest working of the already very hard-working Caribbean islanders, but then Bob Marley had come along and introduced them to a) ganja and b) the concept that by working hard they were playing the white man’s game.

But my friend didn’t care about such political issues. His all-time favourite president, he said, was Ronald Reagan because he was good for immigrants and the economy. He also liked Clinton because of his way with the ladies. He was agnostic about Obama — and certainly didn’t feel any bond with him because of his skin colour.

Then he told me about his childhood growing up on a farm in Dominican Republic, in the saddle for up to 15 hours a day, making his horse stronger for racing by training it in rivers and in the sea. And about his children whom he had deliberately brought up to be ignorant of Spanish because he thought (mistakenly, he realised, in the light of how the southern USA has gone) that they would assimilate better. They were now both officers in the US Navy, one a doctor, one an engineer, clearly destined to join the upper middle class.

And you know how the conversation all began? I told him how horribly burned I’d got on the beach the first day. ‘I don’t expect you’ve ever had sunburn,’ I said. Perhaps I’m maligning my scary young dentist woman, but I can just imagine her glaring her disapproval at such a patently demeaning and racist line of inquiry. She probably thinks I’m Colonel Blimp.

I haven’t quite turned 50 yet and I really still don’t feel that old but when I encounter young people like the dentist girl it makes me feel about 80. And it’s not a good feeling, let me tell you. It gives me an inkling of how my beloved late mother-in-law felt on her final visits to hospital, when the staff would impertinently insist on addressing her by her first name (which they got wrong, by the way). And of how people of a certain generation feel when they innocently use an old-fashioned word like ‘half-caste’ or ‘coloured’ only to have all their offspring squirm with embarrassment, on account of how such phrases simply aren’t used any more.

Not so long ago, I tweeted one of my most oft-retweeted tweets. It went something like: ‘You know how 20 years ago, we looked at the dumbed-down education system and said to ourselves: “When this lot grow up, we are fucked”? Well now they’ve grown up.’

It was popular, of course, because it’s true. I don’t want to slag off the young completely: a lot of them are still great. But I do very much fear that thanks to a combination of several generations’ deliberate dumbing down of education by the Gramsciite left, widespread cultural indoctrination in the politically correct values of the state, and the arrival of a wave of immigrants who (through no fault of their own) are unfamiliar with what Britain is and what it ought to be, people of my generation and older are increasingly doomed to feel like strangers in our country. I’ll save two bullets for my revolver: one for the social worker; one for me.

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Show comments
  • ADW

    Even as we write, I suspect your Pakistani dentist is complaining about whinging middle aged men. ‘Twas ever thus, between the generations, but in multicultural Britain there are even more factors to drive a wedge between generations. What will Britain look like in another 20 years? A balkanised nation with a tiny elite holding all wealth and power. A recipie for success if ever there was one,

    • Nah: she’s just wondering why he never flosses despite being advised to do so.

      • Pacificweather

        Flossing is physically impossible for a man. Hands too big for mouth. I know, but not for foot.

        • Andrew R

          Use plackers – you don’t need to put either hand in your mouth when flossing with plackers.

          • plumpleton

            Plackers? Do you mean those little brushes?

          • Andrew R

            No, they’re not brushes. They’re bits of dental floss set at a right-angle. Easy to put in your mouth and floss with. Google image it and you’ll see what I mean.

        • Ha!

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          There are those little inter-dental deals on a stick.

    • plumpleton

      “Also, she gives off these truly horrible politically correct vibes.” I would have liked a bit more detail on this. It sounds a bit vague and all-in-James’-head.

      • Andrew R

        We’re told that he ‘imagines’ she’d have glared at him suggesting black people don’t get sunburn much, but he gives no evidence this is anything more than just his imagination. Perhaps ‘gives off these truly horrible politically correct vibes’ just means she’s an ethnic minority who didn’t put him at ease by slagging off other ethnic minorities and praising Reagan.

        • Mr B J Mann

          A work colleague once took off his turban to show me how tanned his face was after a visit to India.

          Am I wascist to say he was tanned?!?!?!

          • Andrew R

            Not as far as I’m concerned. Why?

    • Pacificweather

      It could be worse. I once had a very beautiful Indian dentist with a wonderful delicate touch. She would have been perfect but she was obsessed with homeopathy. In the end I could stand it no longer and switched to her husband whose only quality was that he thought homeopathy was ridiculous.

      • ADW

        Didn’t a glass of water sort out your root canal issue then?

        • Pacificweather

          I had the root canal fixed in Quebec by an equally beautiful dentist who only spoke French. Mind you it broke in half in the Philipines and had to be extracted. Beware of beautiful women dentists.

          Edit: The homeopathy was for my gums which are now just fine. They were just fine before the £10 worth of water but they are even better now she assured me with a winning smile. I was a sucker for a pretty dentist in those days.

      • Richard

        That must have made for a very happy marriage.

        • Pacificweather

          As in most good marriages, wives never take their husbands opinions seriously.

          • Sam

            LOL!!

  • Pootles

    Yes, I’ll go with this. Perhaps everyone gets to this stage of life – the stage that you wonder why people aren’t wearing cocked hats anymore. But, on the other hand, there is the thought that comes when one is in certain cities: ‘if I’d wanted to feel like a foreigner, I’d have gone to live abroad.’

    • Mr Grumpy

      If we’re honest it’s a little more specific than ‘abroad’, isn’t it?

    • Pootles, dear. This is about much more than fashion. It’s about the future of civilization. We’re It, and once we’re gone, it may never come back.

      • Pootles

        At least I’ll be dead.

        • One hopes that events will not overtake our living.

    • Pacificweather

      Or North Devon.

      • Pootles

        Arf, arf ! (old person speak for LOL)

    • porcelaincheekbones

      children dressing like hookers

    • Mr B J Mann

      You know the old joke about the dumbing down of exams:

      Usually goes something like in the fifties you’d be asked to write an essay contrasting, say, the development of a certain random industry in the capitals of France and the UK, with the questions getting dumbed down through the decades to Paris is the capital of France and London of the UK, underline the words Paris and London on the map….

      Well I was once flicking through an academic treatise on changes in the in the school curriculum, and came across some examples of changes in exam questions.

      And they were pretty much what the joke describes!

      Always regretted not buying it, as I can’t give a reference to it.

  • MichtyMe

    I puzzle about the streets full of goofy looking, misshapen, folk in comic clothing, some attire resembles pajamas but have been told it is “sportsware” although their physique should exclude that possibility. Where did they all come from, don’t remember it like that in the old days, how to explain, alien abduction and mutation perhaps?

    • Pleetka

      But, you see, it WAS like that in the “old days”. Those elusive, undefinable “old days”. Do you really think that this generation is the first to do, wear and say things that older generations don’t understand? When the New Romantics were flouncing about with their eyeliner and root-boosted hair, did the generation that grew up in the 1950s say “Yes. That makes sense.”? Of course not. The same goes for any decade since probably the start of the 20th Century. I’m playing devil’s advocate here, because I’m 27 and I hate hearing music playing from a phone on the back of the bus and I think that people who leave the house in jogging bottoms and tracksuit tops have given up on any ambition of sartorial elegance. I also agree with the sentiment of this article (though I think that the author was unlucky enough to have discovered a social worker and a dentist who were both idiots) as I used to work in a hotel where burgers could only be cooked medium or worse because the beef wasn’t minced onsite. What I don’t agree with is your golden age thinking regarding generational fashions and “misshapen folk” (whatever that means). The world wasn’t better or worse in your day, it was just YOUR day.

      • I’m 51, and I think it really has got worse. Nevertheless, despite disagreeing with you, I admire the cogency of your comment.

      • Neil Saunders

        I’m 54 and I can state quite objectively that it has got worse in the last 35 years or so (and bear in mind, I wasn’t yet in my 20s when I began to register the deleterious change in the world around me). The evidence is there (documentaries, newsreels, the unwitting testimony of TV programmes and feature films).

        It’s worth pointing out that the New Romantics (who flourished several years before you were born) were a tiny minority of young people – quite unlike the sportswear-donners of the present-day – and in a sense they were just a somewhat ironic retread of the Glam Rock era that preceded Punk (and Glam itself was arch and self-knowing).

        If progress as a concept is meaningful it’s quite possible for decadence to exist as an alternative to it. I’d say that things were getting better gradually, and then the improvement accelerated in the post-1945 era, reaching its zenith in the 1960s (perhaps the “long 60s” – 1958-73 – referred to by the late Arthur Marwick), finally receding rapidly after the Oil Crisis. (The French call the 1945-75 period “les trente glorieuses”.)

        • Scorpion DeRooftrouser

          I simply have to agree. It is in fact the absence of a rebellious youth movement today that is the most clear indication that something has gone wrong. Current teenagers are not rebelling – they are doing what their teachers tell them.

          • Neil Saunders

            They’ve been turned into Red Guards for the Islamo/PC/Corporate/Globalist Cultural Revolution.

          • Sam

            “Islamo/PC/Corporate/Globalist Cultural Revolution.”

            There is no way to make sense of this except as self-parody

          • Neil Saunders

            Sadly, it makes perfect sense. It is the people who pursue this policy (our elites) whose thinking is incoherent, not those who draw attention to its incoherence. It is not intended as parody of any kind.

          • Sam

            Please explain how Islam, political correctness and corporations are related and in what sense they are all part of the same cultural revolution.

            Are you envisaging a horrifying future in which the RSC keeps casting black actors as Henry V; adultery is illegal and punished by flogging; and the NHS is run by Serco? Or what?

          • Simon de Lancey

            Islam, political correctness, and corporations are mere pawns of the Global Zionist Conspiracy.

            Wait – or is the Peruvian Illuminati? I forget; it may well be the Bilderbuggers, but of course names are unimportant, since they are all in reality lizards in disguise.

          • Neil Saunders

            No. I’m reporting a world in which one dominant ideology – Neoconservatism – is the default position of all mainstream political parties in the developed world; in which economic deregulation (originally espoused by the libertarian right) has been combined with sociocultural deregulation, aka Political Correctness (originally espoused by the libertarian left); in which the globalism of transnational corporations is mirrored by the multiculturalism of Metropolitan “liberals”; and in which Islam is simultaneously provoked on its own soil by resource wars related to oil while massive numbers of Muslims are concurrently encouraged to immigrate into Europe and Australasia.

          • country_exile

            Absolutely.

        • Icebow

          The BBC/Guardian Entity must face its Nuremberg.

          • Neil Saunders

            The BBC should certainly be dissolved in its current form and reconstituted as a proper public-service broadcaster, which it is supposed to be by legal requirement under its articles of incorporation.

            Furthermore, the traitors within it should be held accountable for their words and deeds (including acts of omission).

            The Guardian is a slightly different proposition, since it is a privately owned newspaper.

            However, I shudder at the prospect of anything resembling the Nuremberg Tribunals, which were show trials.

          • Icebow

            I am told that the Guardian has £890m stashed away. Let’s confiscate and donate it to the NHS, or towards the Trident update. It essentially acts against private property, so that would be appropriate.
            Show trials are especially characteristic of socialism in power, so perhaps the irony would not be lost on the BBC/Guardian Entity.

          • Simon de Lancey

            A kangaroo court dominated by Soviets with most of the real villains escaping justice and being employed by the Americans? A great idea!

          • Icebow

            I sincerely wish we knew what each other is talking about.

          • Simon de Lancey

            I assumed by your reference to “Nuremberg” you meant the “Nuremberg Trials”. Which were essentially a kangaroo court dominated by the Soviets with most of the real villains escaping justice and being employed by the Americans.

            Clear?

          • Icebow

            When suggesting some day of reckoning, I was under no obligation to imply or include any correspondence to the particular historical circumstances you mention.

          • Simon de Lancey

            Just as well, really, since your historical knowledge appears to be somewhat skimpy.

          • Icebow

            I have suggested no such skimpiness.
            Clear?

          • Simon de Lancey

            By “somewhat skimpy” I meant “sadly lacking”.

          • Icebow

            Transfer to ‘Ignore’ file.

        • Mr B J Mann

          Never forget a documentary about how life has changed which showed a clip about the Aberfan disaster (look it up, youngsters) which showed a clip of a young boy who escaped being asked if he wanted the equivalent of counselling.

          He asked if it would bring his sister back, and when advised that it wouldn’t, pointed out that it would be pointless then!

      • sfin

        There are some good arguments in your post and, as a 52 year old, I often precede any complaint against modern youth culture with:

        “I know I sound like my Dad, but…” – usually followed by the tired old middle aged clichés like “It all sounds the same…”.

        I think I’m more disappointed with youth culture today. I grew up to the soundtrack and fashions of glam rock, progressive rock, punk, funk, disco, new wave, new romantics – from the time I was old enough to buy my first record (TRex – Jeepster!), when I was about ten years old, until my mid twenties. All that inventiveness in 15 years or so.

        What have the last 15 years been like? Apart from Britpop (itself more than heavily influenced by the 60’s and 70’s) we have had variations of HipHop (no talent required) – in my view, an ugly culture which perfectly suits this dumbed down, x factor generation. Any aspiration involves winning BGT by impersonating Beyoncé or the last ‘Boyband’.

        Thanks to a dumbed down education and the outright sinister culture of PC – our youth of today seem to have lost the ability to question, invent and, yes, shock! There has been no ‘revolutions’ in youth culture for a long time now – only the tired same old, same old – and political ‘safe spaces’.

        As an old fart, I claim the right to be confronted and shocked by modern trends, as my parents were – it hasn’t happened yet.

        • Pacificweather

          Old fart shocked by modern trends story. I went to A&E early one Sunday morning bleeding profusely. The others waiting were so sick they were unable to do anything but play with their smart phones. The 20 something triage nurse decided I could safely bleed for an hour whilst those with the more urgent smart phone sickness were treated first.

          • Sam

            Isn’t your story about bad healthcare, not “modern trends”?

          • Pacificweather

            There are two modern trends in the story. The first is people who are not very ill turning up at A&E on a Sunday morning. The second is a triage nurse who doesn’t look at her patients in the waiting room to see who really needs treatment first (the object of triage). Before the modern trend of triage in A&E (invented for field hospitals) the A&E nurse called a doctor to those she (it was mostly middle aged women) could not treat and treated those who needed treatment most urgently. What is the difference I hear you ask. The difference is real triage. The nurse didn’t sit behind a closed door not doing anything else but worked out with and observed her patients as they waited. If someone’s status changed she was there to see it and give immediate assistance. Is that not about bad healthcare you ask. Only if bad healthcare is a modern trend. When received, the care was good. It was the guiding and organising brain that was lacking. That does seem to be a modern trend.

          • Cyril Sneer

            Do you have to be so hateful towards older people? What the f ck is wrong with you?

            Would you be so hateful towards a black man? A black woman? A disabled man?

            Then why all the venom and hatred towards older white people? People who have lived and seen more than you, experienced more, and they know more than you.

            One day if you manage to survive, like them you will be a lot older and a lot wiser to boot. Maybe then you won’t produce such sh t as you do now.

          • Pacificweather

            You have selected the perfect name for yourself. One day you will learn to read English and will start your slow journey to wisdom.

        • Atheissimo

          “HipHop (no talent required) – in my view, an ugly culture which perfectly suits this dumbed down, x factor generation.”

          Is that not exactly what they said about punk at the time?

          It’s your opinion, and you’re entitled to it, but what gets me is the arrogance of the over 50s in thinking that theirs is the first generation to actually be right about young people.

          • sfin

            “Is that not exactly what they said about punk at the time?”

            Yes, probably, but my point is that punk was totally new (which requires inventiveness), a revolution if you like, it lasted 3-4 years and then made way for the next new invention.

            I don’t think it is arrogance to feel that our generation was better educated and freer thinking, giving rise to a youth culture that was more vibrant, required thought, talent and work and thus had more worth.

            Look up Brendan O’Neil’s “Stepford Students” article – which sums up, for me, what I think we’re discussing here.

            The dumbed down, PC, groupthink youth of today have lost their intellectual energy. My argument is that it is perfectly reflected in their culture.

          • Atheissimo

            “I don’t think it is arrogance to feel that our generation was better educated and freer thinking, giving rise to a youth culture that was more vibrant, required thought, talent and work and thus had more worth.”

            Actually yes, that is the dictionary definition of arrogance.

            I’m no fan of current musical trends like dubstep, but you’re deluding yourself if you think they required less though or work than punk.

          • sfin

            My point was not that, to quote your example, dubstep, requires less effort in its creation, it’s the fact that it has been around for about 20 years! Hip Hop even longer.

            It’s all slight variations on the same theme now.

      • Pacificweather

        Unlucky enough? Lucky enough surely? Or his column would be blank this week. He has to keep feeding those below the line or he doesn’t get fed.

    • Pacificweather

      I’ve told you not to go to Carnaby Street. All that nostalgia isn’t good for you.

    • Atheissimo

      This comment could have been written in the 1950s about your own generation. What with their leather jackets and their gelled hair and their rock and roll music.

      I don’t know what’s more sad, that older people actually believe this or that they genuinely can’t see they’ve become the very people they rebelled against in their youth.

      • Dragblacker

        Eventually it does all come to an end, though. Socrates may have bemoaned the younger generation (as the joke goes), but look what happened to Greece afterward: centuries of domination and even now a basket case of a nation. And to think it was once the cradle of Western civilization.

    • davidofkent

      May I add ‘eating and drinking in the street’ to this. I don’t mean sitting at an outdoor café.

  • Dan O’Connor

    Yesterday was another country

    • Aethelflaed

      So is tomorrow

      • nelly0042

        But the goal is for it to not be N. Korea.

        • Pacificweather

          Unless you are an astronomer.

          • nelly0042

            I doubt there are many astronomers who would opt to be in N. Korea, even given the low level of light pollution.

          • Pacificweather

            If you build a large enough telescope they will come.

          • nelly0042

            But the guns and detention camps keep them away.

          • Pacificweather

            There is nothing that North Korea would like more than the kudos of having the world’s greatest astronomers turning up on their door step. If only they could afford to build a giant telescope.

          • nelly0042

            LOL – You’re not that knowledgeable about N. Korea, are you?

          • Pacificweather

            When did you go? It must have been a fascinating trip.

          • nelly0042

            Is inbreeding why you’re such a buffoon, or do you work at it?

          • Pacificweather

            So, not recently then.

          • nelly0042

            So it’s both inbreeding AND your effort at being a dumfuq that we see here on display.
            Here’s a challenge, oh dim bulb, since you fancy N. Korea so much, I challenge you to go there and propose the building of an observatory. Make sure you tell them it’s because of their lack of industrialization that you’re interested.

          • Pacificweather

            When I spoke to the embassy on the phone they told me the USA had promised to give them the world’s biggest telescope if they gave up their nuclear programme. The Supreme Leader will give it his consideration they said but at the moment he is eating imported cheese and can’t be disturbed. A small problem with the local dairy industry it seems. Just temporary you understand.

          • nelly0042

            I spoke with the doctors at your institution, and they explained it. Not only are you the unfortunate result of generations of inbreeding, but you also suffer from a genetic defect where your head is permanently lodged in your rear sphincter. So you’re predisposed to be an a_hole by design.

          • nelly0042

            Oh, by the way, N. Korea is one of a small handful of countries that doesn’t have an embassy in the US. You might ask your keepers to up your meds since you apparently have been hearing voices on your Playschool Sesame Street Smartphone.

          • Pacificweather

            You think that the Spectator is a U.S. newspaper and that its readers are exclusively American?  Now that is a novel idea. 

            The North Korean Embassy is at 73 Gunnersbury Avenue, London, W5 4LP.  It is surprising they can afford even this modest establishment but there it is, large as life, and they even held an art exhibition there last year.  It was in all the papers.  I am surprised you missed it.

          • nelly0042

            You, fecalstain, are the one who brought up the US (“they told me the USA had promised to give them the world’s biggest telescope”).
            I see memory loss and being an a_hole are both symptoms of your genetic disorder.

          • Pacificweather

            The possibility that embassy might actually communicate with the North Korean government had not occurred to you? Nor that the U.S. goverment can and does communicate with the North Korean government? And you say I’m the one who does not know much about North Korea. The expressions pots and kettles, moats and planks come to mind. You seem to make many assumptions not based on facts or even common sense. Perhaps you should try reading more widely than just the Spectator.

          • nelly0042

            Not only do you know little about N. Korea, but you display with each comment that you know precious little about anything. Pots and kettles, moats and planks come to mind because they are your closest intellectual equals.

            I realize how difficult it must be for you to go through life with your head shoved up your backside, but one would think you’d have to pull out now and again just to gulp some air.

          • Pacificweather

            What a shame that you have exhausted your knowledge so soon in such a delightful conversation. Ah well, can’t be helped I suppose. I hope that when you have done a little more research you will come back and update me. It has been a pleasure to have such a civilised conversation. It is seldom one meets someone with your erudition in these discussions.

          • nelly0042

            Tell me, dumbshlt, how many observatories of note are currently in N. Korea? The Dora and Mt. Ohdu Unification Observatories are close to the border, but they keep to the south. They do so because N. Korea is a psychotic regime. No sane person would ever think about going there (which explains both Dennis Rodman’s and your fascination with the place). Large, well-funded, multinational science projects require a stable government in which to build and operate. That’s why CERN is in Switzerland; why Lick, Keck, Sanford and the LIGO are in the US; and why Gran Sasso is in Italy. We reference Greenwich Mean Time as the standard and NOT Pyongyang time because even as wacky as the UK has become, it is still vastly more stable than N. Korea.
            Just once it would be a pleasure to actually discuss a topic with an intelligent person instead of bantering with an idiotic troll like yourself whose cumulative knowledge is on par with a bowel movement.

          • Pacificweather

            Better, much better. I think there may be hope for you yet. A few too many adjectives but you’re getting the idea now.

          • nelly0042

            Oh I got the idea long ago. You’re a bipedal bowel movement in need of a flush.

          • Pacificweather

            In Britain we are taught to ignore the outbursts of people with Tourette Syndrome but I hope you won’t be offended if I ask if there is the possibility of a cure. Unlike North Korea, it is a subject I know very little about.

          • nelly0042

            LOL, then explain, you pompous twit (replace the vowel), the likes of Russell Brand and Gordon Ramsay.
            You’re such a pathetic waste of skin.
            And I’m not even sure you know N
            Korea is north of S. Korea. You don’t even know your head is up your backside.

          • Pacificweather

            Not soon then. My commiserations.

          • nelly0042

            So you won’t be pulling your head out of your sphincter soon. It’s as I suspected, a lifelong affliction.

          • Pacificweather

            I am deeply touched that you continue to communicate with me despite the contempt you hold for me. Such compassion from a stranger can only be admired. Or perhaps you need to have the last word. Do forgive my obtuseness. Please, be my guest.

          • nelly0042

            You’re rectal ooze.

      • Thank god! I hate the past. If only it could be like a meal, all of it: you eat it, enjoy it, forget it, sh*t it. Gone! On with the next. I hate memories.

        • Pacificweather

          What did you say?

          • Well I didn’t mean a current conversation!

        • Richard

          You can’t do that. How do you know who you are if you don’t remember how you responded to different situations? How do you build up a picture of yourself if you deny that you existed before this moment?

          • I want the ‘picture of myself’ to be who I am now, not who I was — in the life that other people foisted on me.

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          Aka, dumping the groceries.

          • Callipygian

            And it must be so. Would you want a warehouse containing all the meals you’ve ever eaten? Well, I don’t want the memories.

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      … From those Bourne no traveller returns.

  • Norman Brand

    A retired social worker I know once told me that a person’s ability to make a cup of tea was used as a test to see whether an old person could look after him or herself. If the social worker in this report thought that her client lacked the ability because she used loose tea leaves and warmed the pot, heaven help people of my generation. And, James Delingpole, I am in my 80th year.

    • SimonToo

      But which evil genius teaches the social workers tea-making techniques? Time to master the Japanese tea ceremony, to confound social workers in my dotage.

      Unless he plans on returning, Jackthesmilingblack had better graduate from his Ty-Phoo teabags, before Japanese social services come a-knocking.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        For your information Sime, here in Japan we have what is known as the “dashi” bag. Essentially an empty teabag, the intended purpose is for stock in cooking. However, it functions well when filled with loose tea, allowing different teas to be mixed, or even dried fruit peal to be included.
        Surely everyone with a functioning brain realises teabags contain the sweepings from the factory floor. I recently had a tour of the Boh Tea plant in the Cameron Highlands, and in the tea room apdjecent to the Gift Shop they serve tea made with loose tea. Same with the tea growing area in the hills above Kandy. They still warm the milk. How’s that for a trip down memory lane!
        So Ty-Phoo tea, gimme a break. That for the mug punters that don’t know any better.
        But check the Indian quarter in KL or George Town for some wholesale action. “I took rooms in the native quarter.”
        Jack, Japan Alps

        • Doninwindsor

          I miss those little bags they sold for tea etc in the 100 Yen shops. Daiso is far far better than anything we have here.

          • Ambientereal

            A little fabric from an old t shirt and 10 inches of cordon and you can make your own tea bag. If the t shirt is white, then it is better. Wash it carefully and rinse with some chlorine.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            There are Daiso outlets in Malaysia, but at RM5.00, not such a good deal as the 100 yen stores here in sunny Japan.

    • porcelaincheekbones

      they want to keep the house, even when privately owned they can wrangle control of finances

    • Terry Field

      What if they have loose tea and not bags??????
      Straight to the protein farm??????

      • LuluB

        Sorry, today’s “pre-crime” police are immune to your concerns:

        Those using loose tea are most likely from an older generation, White and therefore, obviously racist and should be punished as such.

        Men who were born with male genitalia are rapists in waiting and should be punished, ASAP before they complete the crimes they were, obviously, destined to commit.

        Women who refuse to toe the line of radical, Third Wave Feminists are obviously victims of “Stockholm Syndrome” and should be deemed mentally unfit to make decisions.

        All unapproved laughter shall be punished.

        It’s just the way things are.

        • Dragblacker

          The Left really does believe the white male is a god on Earth if they think that they’re the cause for everything good and bad on the planet. Their anti-Western screeds are little more than narcissistic self-flagellation.

    • LuluB

      I’m concerned that social workers can’t tell the difference between a woman simply using tea leaves and the real measure of an inability to care for herself: If she’d poured water into a flower pot and then happily served the pot to a guest. I suppose the Social Worker’s Professors and superiors weren’t specific enough about what she should be looking for.

      Lack of nuance — detecting it and using it — seems to be the curse of today’s youngest generations (I say this as a ripe, old Millenial who has seen this awful progression from the oldest to the youngest within even my own, generation). Discretion, logic and discernment is going the way of The Dodo.

      There’s a difference between thinking and awaiting orders but a significant portion of young people don’t appear to know it and simply goose-step to whomever they’re admiring, today.

    • David davis

      The SocialNazi worker didn’t give a stuff about the teamaking. All that she wanted (I bet it was a woman) was to see that the old dear was doing something “not in the book”, so that she could be forcibly sent to a Dying-House.

  • Destroying our own identity and importing millions who cling to their foreign identity as there is none in the uk well what could fail?

    • zanzamander

      Jeremy Vine on his radio programme just now interviewed an gave a leg up to an Islamist about the Trojan Horse Islamic infiltration of schools in Birmingham. Basically what they (Jeremy Vine and the Islamist) agreed upon was that since the schools in question have 99.99% Muslim students, it can, by law, provide education that reflects the religious and cultural values of the students. Basically these are Islamic schools now and British values does not apply to them.

      This is what will become of the towns and cities in Britain when their population becomes majority Muslims.

      We only have to thank our politicians, media, educators, trades unions, teachers for this.

      • jim

        Agreed but don’t forget our “rats on meths” corpo-elite who know the price of everything and the value of nothing and will, without a second thought slash and burn our civilization for a buck . They won’t be happy until we’re all living in Brazil. They are all in it together..

      • The Sceptic

        This was, sadly, inevitable. The IFLA defines multiculturalism thus: “…the co-existence of diverse cultures, where culture includes racial, religious, or cultural groups and is manifested in customary behaviours, cultural assumptions and values, patterns of thinking, and communicative styles.”

      • rightrightright
      • Richard

        And ourselves, for voting for them. I mean, voting for Tony Blair in three elections? Cool Britannia? Such ephemera! People who do that don’t deserve – according to the laws of nature – to survive. They are the detritus of humanity, by my reckoning, lower than the beasts of the jungle. You will find examples of such people throughout history, in Greek tragedy and histories of the ancient world. Brits have misconstrued the basis of their existence, preferring the vapidity of politics and ephemeral power of money. Such self-consuming organisms cannot survive.

        The only thing taken seriously in Britain is money. All else is laughed at.

      • UKSteve

        And “ourselves”, for perpetuting it at the ballot box.

        I’ve never seen so many frikkin’ people whinge, whine and bitch in forums.

        But at the last general election, only 2/3rds of those registered to vote, did so. (It’s estimated 48% of under-25’s aren’t even registered.) Despite the expenses scandal (2009) and the banking collapse (2008), 86% of those who voted did so for the exact same 3 parties that created exactly the situation you’ve described.

        If you want change, you’re going to have to start voting for it, start selectively paying for it (media, TV, newspapers etc.) and start complaining about it (poor service, broadcasting bias, etc). And getting vocal.

        Just sitting on your arse watching Eastenders won’t do it. It’s all up to you.

  • Bogomil Gospodinov

    “The past is a foreign country and we are only tourists”

  • Sweary Expat

    If you find conversation with your dentist difficult, just try talking to her about fox hunting. I’m sure she’ll be fascinated.

    • alfredo

      Or liven up the conversation with a few words about FGM …

  • GBS

    Delingpole I’m afraid no matter how hard you try, or how much you drop in that you hunt and your son goes to Eton, you shall never be a ‘gent’. You are just a bit too much of a social climber. And a bit too crass.

    • jamesdelingpole

      So that’s twice, now, you’ve made this point, Johnny. Clearly it must matter to you very much and I’m glad you’ve got it off your chest.

      • GBS

        Not sure who Johnny is I’m afraid. Clearly I’m not the only one who sees through!

        • No, not the only one. Attending Eton will be the making of his son, as it seems to be the making of everyone; but then again, one does not choose one’s parents. (I won’t speak to one of mine and have little to say to the other.)

      • Oedipus

        Oh do be quiet you oik

      • GraveDave

        I like you James, even though you are an arrogant sob.

        • Jourdelays

          I agree some things are decently written, but his insecurities over not being upper-class reek to high heaven…

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          sob? Like the unintended irony.

      • Andrew R

        And it mattered enough to you to keep tabs on who said what and how many times.

    • alfredo

      Fascinating. I suppose you must be able to tell who is or isn’t a gent. by being one yourself. Not an easy thing to judge from the outside. It would be interesting to know how you acquired this status. Did others stop you in the street and say ‘you are clearly a gent’, or is it self-awarded?

      • Not an easy thing to judge from the outside.
        Who are you to judge how someone judges? Some of us have been reading Delingpole for years. We judge, as intelligent people do. (And are judged in our turn: so be it.)

        • alfredo

          Interesting nom de folie you’ve adopted. I wonder how far it’s justified – not that I want to find out at first hand, you understand.

          • Well I don’t believe in bragging, as there’s always someone that knows the truth. And I could post a video of me bellydancing, in the skirt of thirteen ‘petals’ with the slits up to — here, but that would be immodest. It might, however, satisfy your curiosity.

          • alfredo

            I’ll take your word for it. Thank you.

          • Cheers!

    • More than a bit crass, GBS. Crass is his middle name: it’s the ice cream in the middle of the Baked Alaska.

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      A hay harvest breeze
      Birds of a feather
      Body between your knees

  • Aethelflaed

    Live the life you want James, and give as good as you get – I know lots of younger people who still have non PC values. If you don’t like you dentist,change her – you’re the customer. And as for social workers – their reputation is probably lower than estate agent; who cares what they write about.

    I find it fascinating to see how these ‘PC brain-washed’ individuals, as they get older, start to come up against the foolishness of their creed. As Ghandi said, “if you are right and know it, speak your mind” “never apologies for being correct”. The PC ones will either listen and learn something to their advantage, or carry on finding their ideology at odds with reality.

    • What did Ghandi know? Like Napoleon, a conqueror of imaginations but deeply flawed as a soul and exploitative of the actual, vulnerable humans around him.

  • Tiger Lily

    If you don’t like how Britain is turning out, feel free moving to the U.S. That country is still full of ignorant, religious bigots. You’ll fit right in.

    • rodger the dodger

      Never mind the U.S.. What do you have to say about the “ignorant, religious bigots” in the UK? Such as those in Rotherham, Bradford, and Tower Hamlets in London?

      I’m curious…

    • BARROSO

      If only you could understand how thick you are.

    • UKSteve

      I see this isn’t the only moronic comment you’ve made in Disqus – “Well done you” on the consistency.

      Now, don’t you have to clean behind the fridge?

    • Idiot. Please don’t come here. We’re full up with idiots as it is.

    • Richard

      They say fish helps the brain.

    • Anonymous

      Hi Tiger Lilly, I’m guessing from your profile pic we’re about the same age. As a Brit who grew up in America, having lived back home for two years, boy have I had my eyes opened. Far from being a nation of ‘religious, ignorant bigots,’ America is still a place where the free exchange of ideas is not only fostered but positively encouraged, people are interested in their lives and excited about their future. In Britain on the other hand, thanks to the past Labour government and our army of communist inspired state schools, we have a nation of people who are insular, parochial, disinterested and uninspired. The sooner Britain bucks the PC horse within it’s media and it’s institutions, the happier and more successful this country will be.

    • mohdanga

      What, you mean like Obumbler stocking all the sensitive US security agencies with Muslim Brotherhood operatives?

  • Guy Crouchback

    Would that one could have a revolver, James!

  • Captain Concerned

    This is so sad and true. I’ve just turned 50 – similar age to the author, and I sympathise entirely with his concerns regarding the PC madness that is denigrating all that we hold dear. Sure, embracing the future and evolving is necessary, but not at the complete annihilation of our past attitudes and culture – is certainly not all bad!

    I now live in Singapore and we have just lost a very significant leader, and it is heart warming to see the respect and gratitude that the people have, even though he was not always considered tolerant of alternative points of view and modern attitudes. Its hard to argue that Singapore hasn’t moved with the times, indeed it is one of the most advanced cities in the world, but people still respect one another and can discuss differences, racial or otherwise, without fear of retribution or embarrassment. We could learn a thing or two!

    • Jackthesmilingblack

      Sure, but if only they’d make those ATM at the airport a little more user friendly, because it really is difficult to get money out.

  • HD2

    Hear hear!
    The use of Mr, Mrs, Miss XXX as the ONLY acceptable form of address to patients is a long overdue measure.

  • UriahOlathaire

    The millennials and their identity politics are proof we all failed at parenting.

    • UKSteve

      We failed as a society.

      The Marxist teaching unions for scrapping essential subjects, the gov’t for forcing a ‘US of Europe’ on us, the pure evil of ‘multiculturalism’ was sneaked in by Blair (and to an extent, Major before him), but no-one countered it, etc, etc.

      The political Left has won, so – of course – we’ve all lost.

  • AndrewMelville

    Actually, James, black folks do get sun burned. I had made the same assumption as you, but I was corrected by a scientist, a black man, with whom I was working on a new sunblock product. He pointed out that black chaps often make the same assumption as well and so don’t use sunblocks and as a result can be quite badly burned.

    Who knew!

    • I did. I remember it happening to that idiot Chris Lewis, who used to play cricket for England.

    • UKSteve

      And are almost as susceptible to skin cancer.

      • Richard

        In South Africa, they almost never get skin cancer. Ethnic Europeans, on the other hand…

        • UKSteve
          • Richard

            You do understand the difference between “all races are at risk” and “all races are equally at risk”? Blacks are at risk, but not as much at risk. Here is an article for you to read: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/race.htm

            High melanin content in the skin protects against skin cancer from harsh sunlight, which is why black people have that type of skin. The greater the degree of sun exposure, the greater the amount of melanin. That’s how evolution works. White people have historically lived in the Northern Hemisphere and have had no need of that concentration of melanin. So, when they move to places like Africa and Australia, their skin is not protected as much as blacks, and they are much more likely to develop melanoma. When blacks move to the Northern Hemisphere, their dark skin is unable to synthesise vitamin D sufficiently, and they suffer greatly from sugar diabetes.

            A little more reading and a little less swearing helps make the world a happier place.

          • UKSteve

            A little more reading and a little less pontificating pompously and follishly in your case, would be most welcome. What you initially wrote was nonsense; I was fully aware of what you wrote about ethnicities.

            CDC figures (USA) notwhtstanding, I was referring to this, and subsequent studies, such as Elsevier.

  • visioneer

    Medium rare meat? Unknown in the older generation. A friend’s father would not eat in candle lit restaurants, because he needed to see that meat was throughly cooked…This is about Britain ?

    • Mr Grumpy

      Pubs where they ask you how you want your burger done? Unknown until the day before yesterday, still unknown outside the M25. He’s not a very convincing fogey.

      • Jambo25

        They used to ask my wife and I how we wanted our burgers done in the New York Steam Packet, up Rose Street Lane, in Edinburgh back about 1971 or 72.

        • Mr Grumpy

          Obviously a very progressive establishment. I’m not entirely sure that I’d ever eaten a burger in 1972.

          • Jambo25

            It seemed to be run by hippies.

          • Pacificweather

            It’s those subtle herbs they put in them that makes all the difference.

          • Mr Grumpy

            An additional reason not to opt for medium rare.

          • Jambo25

            They were OK. Played good music as their background tracks.

        • Pacificweather

          Chicago Meat Packers a few years later did too.

      • UKSteve

        Which proves you haven’t been outside the M25 – I’ve been asked in two places round herein the last 2 months.

        • Mr Grumpy

          I overgeneralise of course, but no, I live outside the M25 and don’t venture inside more than I can help. My local did excellent burgers until a recent change of chef but I don’t recall ever being asked. Fortunately I like mine well done.

          • UKSteve

            Me too.

            The “to order” thing may be to pander to Americans – they treat their burgers with the reverence we have or steak.

      • Pacificweather

        There used to be an American style burger bar in Heston in the early ’80s that asked you how you wanted your burger. They had a great range of toppings too.

  • Joyce

    The highly-qualified dental surgeon who has taken over my local practice is in his twenties. He calls himself ‘Doctor’ rather than ‘Mister’ which for this sixty-plus spinster is rather unnerving, especially when I am addressed as ‘Darling’ or ‘Dear’ when not being called ‘Mrs X’. He is Indian and judged by his common-as-muck accent was brought up at a nearby public school. Not wanting to appear foolish by appearing to mistake him for an immigrant, I have mentioned that his title is off-puttingly un-British while pointing out that I, like most of the local residents, am not American.

    • Twenty Rothmans

      I suppose that you could wind him up by chatting about your homeopath, Dr Jones.

    • Twenty Rothmans

      I suppose that you could wind him up by chatting about your homeopath, Dr Jones.

      • Joyce

        What a good idea, Twenty Rothmans ! I know one with a PhD in experimental psychology. Thanks .

  • evad666

    I am more concerned about the implication there is a revolver and more than two rounds of ammunition to hand.
    Today I would suggest several thousand rounds and an automatic should be held.

  • Kasperlos

    Brilliant – observations that others age 45 and over note daily, but do not write about. Troubling is that the new generations, the foot soldiers of the new order, truly believe in ‘their mission’ as prescribed for them by the phony lot in academia, government and the corporate advertising aided by their army of flunky psychologists. Like the Red Guards of the Maoist era, today’s group proudly wave their diplomas as a record of feeble indoctrination without a shred of thought given as to a world that was once human and free. For an older generation to have some hesitation about the younger is nothing new. But this time any ‘gut feeling’ that it isn’t going to be pretty is spot on. The gentle, quaint, and proper Britain is but a distant memory for most. In its place comes the at once crass, docile and zombified lot who have about as much going for them as a cyborg. Proving that the onward march of high tech has left a sterile canvas. It allows for constant change but leaves nothing of note to remember. Ultimately, their legacy to the Western Tradition will be the worth of a plastic microchip wasting away for a 1,000 years in a rubbish tip. Welcome to the future. Now.

    • Steve B

      Yes, the real question is how did we become so hopeless? As we know, the fish rots from the head downwards, and I think there must have been some crucial stage when the establishment decided it no longer believed in this country and its values. The sixties is the usual culprit, is it not? Everything is valid, man, let it all hang out…all authority is fascism, etc. But the sixties was surely a symptom of the crash of western values and authority caused by two world wars. We lost God, social stability and everything else. The only thing I do know is that the cultural Marxists do not have an enduring answer. They are not natural and their stance cannot hold for ever. In the end some kind of natural order will reassert itself, and it will not be their worldview.

      • davidofkent

        The Foreign Office has been managing Britain’s decline for several decades. It was a policy in the 1950s as we returned well-managed colonies back to their tribalism. I notice that none of them except India has dragged themselves back up again by their bootstraps.

        • Dragblacker

          I’d include Sri Lanka and, for certain, Singapore to that list. Malaysia doesn’t seem too badly off either. It’s mostly the African countries that have the worst problems.

      • Icebow

        As I’ve said before, we need a Cultural Treason Act.

        • Sam

          Well that makes you sound pretty fascist.

          • Icebow

            I’m unbelievably sorry.
            ‘Political correctness’ is Cultural Marxism in action, and that is a form of subversion.

          • Sam

            You don’t have to be sorry. It just sounds like you have quite fascist values.

          • Icebow

            Fascism is a form of socialism, and many avowed socialists are effectively fascistic in practice. I dare say they are to be found in the ranks of that auto-rent-a-mob Unite Against Fascism.

          • Sam

            If you say so. All I’m saying is that the concept of “cultural treason” sounds distinctly Stalinist. You seem to have a bit of a totalitarian impulse

          • Icebow

            It doesn’t to me.
            I have not.

      • Neil Saunders

        Broadly true, except that religion has been in decline in the West for quite some time; certainly, since the Enlightenment. In the mid-Victorian period (concurrent with Darwin’s “Origin of Species”) Tennyson came close to expressing agnosticism in “In Memoriam”, while Matthew Arnold and – a little later – Thomas Hardy expressed it explicitly, and Edward FitzGerald (in his very free translation of “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”) by implication.

        That said, even the vestiges of Christian culture and morality are rapidly falling away from our society, and nothing better has come to replace them; quite the opposite, in fact.

  • GraveDave

    Immigrants, coming over to do the jobs we’re too ‘thick and lazy’ to do.

    A care home and its former boss have been fined nearly £337,000 after a 100-year-old died falling from a hoist when foreign nurses failed to strap her in properly.

    Great-grandmother May Lavinia Ward was being moved from her chair to her bed when she fell 5ft to the floor.

    She hit her head and fractured her hip and knee but instead of calling for help her two
    nurses changed the bloodied pensioner’s clothes and put her to bed.

    Shasha Wei, from China, and Rumyana Ivanova, from Bulgaria, even changed Ms Ward into clean clothes and took 40 minutes to call for help.

    And by no means are incidents like this ‘isolated’ or rare these days.

    • English_Independence_Movement

      Immigrants, coming over to do the jobs we’re too ‘thick and lazy’ to do: because Immigrants haven’t had the ‘advantage’ of our Welfare state hence they are prepared to work.

      • Cyril Sneer

        Indeed, also many immigrants live in shared accommodation and thus their outgoings are far lower than someone with a family and full mortgage.

        They can basically afford to work for less but most normal folk with a roof to pay for, family to feed simply cannot compete for work that low paid.

        This is something the left forget in their bigoted and prejudiced opinions towards Brits in this country.

      • mohdanga

        I wouldn’t say they are prepared to work….many of them know how to rort the system without ever working. Just look at Jihadi John’s case…..in the UK for almost 20 years and none of them ever worked. Multiply this by several hundred thousand (at least, given that 75% of Muslim women and 50% of the men don’t work) and see the result.

  • ColinPowis

    There is indeed a nostalgia and even craving for certain things from the 1950’s when , in some ways , Britain was a better country ; much of this is due to the ”Dearth of God ” …indeed , we humans crave meaning and will desperately avoid being cast adrift , nay marooned , in a gloomy archipeligo of existential despair…we long to believe in something , and that ,more than anything else, explanes the post modern cult of Global Warming …it is indeed the religious impulse shoehorned and pressganged into semi secular belief …a neo -pagan cult of scientism

    I was recently watching a documentary of an old unrepetant German woman who is still a convinced Nazi ; she spoke passionately and romantically about National Socialism and also about environmentalism /Global warming … let’s face it , it’s just the type of pseudo religious , junk science that Hitler , Himmler and Hess would of embraced and would of dovetailed nicely with their bogus theories of race and genetics

  • UKSteve

    “…becoming a lost country.”

    Seriously, James? “Becoming”?

    People have been saying “I don’t recognise my country any more” for 10 years or so.

    • Pacificweather

      No, it’s 50 years at minimum.

      • Andrew R

        They’ve ALWAYS been saying it. You can go on all you want about how much things have changed, one thing that has NOT changed is old fogies moaning about how much things have changed and how the younger generation are all idiots. Today’s old people are the baby boomers of the sixties who spent all their time having sex and smoking illegal drugs. You can imagine what THEIR parents said about THEM!

        • mohdanga

          True…but back in the 1960s there weren’t 4 million+ assimilateable Muslims being kowtowed and catered to by politicians and millions more of 3rd worlders being invited in. That’s the biggest change.

          • Andrew R

            Yes, in the 1960s it was different minorities that ‘English Country Gents’ were complaining about and demanding to be spoken to with more deference – Irish, Pakistanis, West Indian.

        • Pacificweather

          You can never have too much sex and illegal drugs but unfortunately this baby boomer was not one of those who did. In fact, in comparison to later generations, most of us were amateurs in comparison to the likes of The Rolling Stones. We had neither the money or the sex appeal. But it might just be failing memory. As they say, if you remember the sixties you weren’t there.

      • UKSteve

        Not sure what country you’re talking about.

        As I said…10.

        • Pacificweather

          My grandad said the same thing about London in 1911 so it seems like it might be over a century. I guess it depends what it is that you don’t recognise any more. My uncle said the same in 1945 but it had been knocked about a bit by then.

          • UKSteve

            I think my generation (1950’s born) has coped reasonably well with the technological change “thing”. But what has devastated this country – in my eyes – are the twin evils of the Devil’s own devices – multiculturalism and uncontrolled immigration for the purpose of social / electoral engineering. These were the basis for my comment.

            They’ve come to light thanks to the courage of the Telegraph, and conffirmed what intelligent people have suspected all along.

          • Pacificweather

            My grandad’s beef was uncontrolled immigration until he married an immigrant. Well, actually he still moaned about it. My uncle hated the immigrants who came in the 1940s. Then they all disappeared to France and he never saw them again. My aunt was very disappointed about that.

            Joking aside, the only issue I would take with you is the reasons for it. It you think it was for anything other than cheap labour you are deluding yourself. Now we have had the last Labour government and the current coalition government encouraging cheap labour with employer subsidies. It used to be that employment produced taxes, now taxes produce employment.

            When I was young, if an employer did not pay a living wage nobody worked for him so he had no choice. Now, he can pay minimum wage safe in the knowledge that the taxpayer will top this up with housing benefit and tax credits. What is more, he can hire workers from abroad who do not know the cost of living and exploit them until they get sick of it and go home. Then he hires some more and so on.

            The Chancellor has an unexplained £12.5 billion hole in the welfare budget which he refuses to say how he will close it. Labour have come clean and said they will raise the minimum wage to reduce the employer subsidies. Is that also Osborne’s plan or will he cap benefits and rely on the immigration cycle to fill the lost cost labour gap. Your guess is as god as mine. Employer subsidies are the worst form of socialism.

            I want to live in a country where employment produces taxes not taxes produce employment. Only Labour is now right wing enough to at least address the problem it created and the Conservatives adopted.

          • UKSteve

            “It you think it was for anything other than cheap labour you are deluding yourself”

            Well, having read quite a bit, I’m not

            I actually agree with a great deal of what you say.

            But where we part company is Labour. That collection of clueless morons have had 2 goes at bakrupting my country, once under Wilson / Callaghan, once under Blair / Brown. You are spot on about benefits subsidising low-paid employees, I know someone who heard a group of small businessmen sharing “intel” on what they can get away with paying employees, so that benefits kick in.

            Now we have bunch of viciously nasty elititist toff Tories who seem to be intent on forcing the remaning unemployed into homelessness, by slashing benefits.

            This is, of course, so that we can pile more benefits onto immigrants who have done F all for this country; doubtless you don’t know about this either.

            The working class people of this country have been betrayed multiple times by these tw4t$ asking for votes. I’m voting Monster Raving Loony – just because I don’t think they’d be so vicious or treacherous.

          • Pacificweather

            I can’t argue about Blair/Brown but most of us were in work under Wilson/Callaghan and fewer were under Thatcher who spent our oil revenues keeping 4 million people unemployed. Besides, Wilson kept us out of Vietnam when I was an age to be sent there so I have great affection for him. He was not an American puppet like Blair and he didn’t waste billions on the poll tax like Thatcher or Tax Credits like Brown. He also started the Open University where my wife got her degree. In fact the more I write about him the more I think he was, with Macmillan, one of our best post war Prime Ministers.

          • Pacificweather

            The child benefit being paid overseas is so typical Cameron. He pretended it was an EU directive then later anounced he’s stopping the payments. The truth was nobody in goverment or the civil service thought about (or cared about) the rules until they were caught out. Then they changed the rules and tried to claim clever negotiation with the EU. What a shyster that man is.

  • Molly NooNar

    ‘coming back from Florida, the other day’ … as you do, just an ordinary day occurrence.

    Imaging saying that the young are from another world entirely when compared to this “gent” they obviously are financially. If the young could jet off to Florida they would never come back. There is nothing for them here, the way they are treated is appalling.

    • Indeed. I live in Florida — a couple of hours up the coast from Naples, just south of Sarasota — and there is no reason to go anywhere else, except to visit.

    • Richard

      I was also poor when I was young. It generally does with the turf. As you get older, life changes, you learn and make decisions, and change your circumstances. Imagine if you stayed the same through your whole life. But I think that is the way the Left would like us to be, all the same, always the same.

      • Molly NooNar

        A little partronising. The question is whether your decisions and choices are influenced by the money and lifestyle you now have. If it is then it would seem intellectually vapid to criticise the young for not caring about what you value now.

        • Richard

          I don’t think I have changed that much. The values I had then I still have now. They were things like, nobody owes you a living, take care of yourself, help others when you can, don’t throw good after bad, be diligent, etc. I cared as much then as I do now about the past, ways and manners of my grandparents, how what I might do today could influence tomorrow, and that whatever I do should be universally applicable. In other words, what would happen if what I did was done by everyone.

          • Molly NooNar

            That’s fair enough. I don’t necessarily think that the young don’t have such values though.

  • edted

    Yeah Delingpole is 100% right!.. 60/70’s were great times! Non of the is PC Stuff. We could call the local corner shop the Pakis and go out for a Saturday night Chinky! STANDARDS WE HAVE LOST!

    • mohdanga

      Because everyone did this, right? And I’m sure there wasn’t any discrimination leveled at white, English who happened to be from a different part of the country.

  • ErictheHorse

    Thanks for the advice on the bullets, I suspect I would get more satisfaction and better care, I just shot the social worker, and allowed the judicial system to take care of me from thereon in.

  • little islander

    British have lost the art of being themselves.

  • Depends how you define ‘gent’. Gents don’t slather themselves in pornography: and you do.

  • John Bindon

    Miserable sods, virtually the lot of you. Complaining about “the times we live in” is so dull. Everyone over the age of about 40 does it in every single generation without fail. You think the middle-aged and older generation didn’t moan about the “young” in the fifties? In the 1850’s as well ? Of course they did. This article just makes Delingpole sound like Taki. This is more or the less the column he writes every week.

    And the dentist is partonising ? How about you, then :

    “I don’t want to slag off the young completely: a lot of them are still great.”

  • tenbelly

    What’s a burger James?

  • tzioneretz

    Oh, whatever.

    Countless millions voted AND CONTINUE TO VOTE for those who systematically and brazenly dismantled the British society (such as it was) and values.

    Face it: All Brit voters care about is a penny of the income tax here or there.

  • Scion

    Boo hoo. Let’s just be glad this Stalinist James Delingpole, has no opportunity to use the state to impose his frankly Communist social order on anyone else. This fake “right wing” commentator basically wants everyone to be a loser like him. Keep praying – mutter to the sky or kiss the floor – your prayers won’t be answered Mr Delingpole.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    When I occasionally fall into conversation with Brits here in Japan, I am literally shocked not only by their ignorance (they appear to know less than half of FA), but also by their lack of interest. Talking of middle age Brits with no more than 10 years’ experience in Japan, rather than resident abroad friends of some 30-40 years standing.
    Conversation topics range from history, geography, foreign travel, science, physics, astrophysics, maths, current affairs, politics, music, motion pictures, politics, miscarriages of justice, conspiracy theories, food/cooking, automobiles, artisan skills, fashion garments …
    Zero interest. But the real knee buckler is these Muppets accuse me of being boring. If this is what expats are like, I dred to think what the average run of the mill thicko washed up on the UK beach is like. Conversation limited to football and soaps.
    Jack, Japan Alps

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    If you want the instant version of how far Britain has gone downhill, look no further than the decline in writing skills, specifically spelling. Also, the notion of reading through before submitting is a long-forgotten skill. And even copying the names of people in the news: Miliband, Savile are obvious cases in point. Worse if that were possible, the general population is so dumped down that nobody cares about a spelling error, largely because they are so surrounded by misspelling they no longer recognize error. And when forced to acknowledge an error, they arrogantly dismiss it as unimportant and thus insignificant.
    Kids today, what should you do with um!
    Jack, Japan Alps

    • Pacificweather

      I bet they say the same about the brush strokes of the kids today in Japan. Can’t tell a fire alarm from a fire bell.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        I have to admit I have difficulty telling a fire alarm from a fire bell.

  • SimonToo

    “…on her final visits to hospital, when the staff would impertinently insist on addressing her by her first name (which they got wrong, by the way)”. Snap! It seemed better not to correct them – it would have been more discourteous had they then used the right one.

  • Jackthesmilingblack

    Great story about the Muppet social worker and the elderly lady’s teap making skills.

    • Pacificweather

      It’s not original. I first read it about 15 years ago in the letters section.

  • Fenman

    What it is is what the great philosopher Durkheim called a dtate of ‘anomie’, basically social chaos created by having many sub-cultures whose core values are in direct conflict with the trad. host culture. As nearly all the champagne socailists read PPE or its equivalent they must have known what they were doing this by pushing the self-destructive policies of mult-cultrism and political correctness. So one can only draw the conclusion that Brown, Blair, Straw, Mandelson, Campbell etc wished to destroy British society. Well, as most of us realised several year ago they succeeded. The fcat that Millie is 4point up in the polls is prove enough.
    great Britain RIP.

    • Richard

      They knew there were enough people of that mindset to vote them into power. Make no mistake, it’s all about power. I have known people who change their tunes in order to slip into the prevailing stream in order to boost their own power and prospects. It takes real courage to push the tiller to steer in a direction different from that you are already on. The early Labourites were perhaps really doing what they thought was good for others; since Wilson it has been doing what they thought was good for themselves.

    • Pacificweather

      Then there is the chaos of no sub culture like Japan in 1941.

  • Pacificweather

    Headline: Desperate Delingpole Delights in Dentist.

    What would journalists do for copy without taxi drivers. Does Delingpole like Sellers book his dental appointments for 2:30 pm.

  • The Red Bladder

    And what about those of us who don’t give tupence how “burgers” are cooked but simply regard them as a modern abomination?

    • Pacificweather

      Modern? Like jeans?

      • The Red Bladder

        Another imported sartorial frippery. I wouldn’t be buried in a pair yet alone seen in public!

        • Pacificweather

          Better make sure you insist on an open coffin. I heard they are favoured by undertakers for dressing the deceased with a suit jacket, shirt and tie on top for those half opening coffins.

          • The Red Bladder

            I shall bear that in mind when the time comes, thanks for the tip.

    • tbusby3

      Is this (and it’s associated comments) real or parody?

      • The Red Bladder

        You never really can be sure with most of the stuff you see around here.

        • tbusby3

          Excellent response

  • Richard

    As somebody who moved to the UK from Africa (of British descent), I must say that I find Britain quite Orwellian. People don’t actually deal with each other, instead they deal through the mediation of “official culture”, which is quite odd to me. Conversation is like walking on egg-shells, as you never know what lines you are crossing. Any reference to anybody’s origins, colour, or culture is strictly forbidden: you are expected to have no eyes or ears, and to walk through life like one of the Teletubbies, hugging everybody and making inane noises (conversation as it now exists in the UK). There is no past, only the ever-moving present, and no concrete future. At the end of each day, it is dead, and seems to imbue nothing to the future, other than to be laughed at, or to be an example of how bad people were then. Perhaps it is a sort of enforced amnesia, to prevent collective identity. To my mind it is akin to the demolition of old buildings, in order to make only functionality important, and to prevent any concrete (excuse the pun) identification with a past in which things might have been different to the present.

    When I was growing up, I was always being told, “UK isn’t UK anymore” by the hordes of emigres escaping Heath and Callahan. That, to me, is now incontrovertible. What is left is a sort of officious and soulless geographical location, with no character or identity. What a strange place it is.

    • Pacificweather

      It you moved to Britain from Africa (a continent of many cultures) how do you know what Britain was like in the past? Have you not considered it was always what you would call a strange place.

      • Richard

        Sorry, I just went off to make some loose-leaf tea. Lots of family visits, and cultural closeness.

        • Pacificweather

          British grown loose leaf tea is very good. Never trust your family for sound information. Remember, they once told you your Christmas presents were brought by Father Christmas.

          • English_Independence_Movement

            I can tell you the UK’s changed quite a lot in the last forty years. Is that enough for you?

          • Pacificweather

            No, I want more. Detail, I love detail. The last time someone said that to me they were talking about the world in general. Give me detail.

          • English_Independence_Movement

            Looks like you just want to go on a fishing expedition….

          • Pacificweather

            Yes please. Fishing is my favourite pass time. Shall we go to Florida?

          • English_Independence_Movement

            If you’re paying, yes.

          • Pacificweather

            In that case we’d better make it the Thames at Hampton Court.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            `British grown loose tea…`
            That would be in the Cameron Highlands?

          • Pacificweather

            Tregothnan in Cornwell. https://tregothnan.co.uk/.

            I do like ‘Boh’ tea from the Cameron Highlands as well.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            I tend to agree regarding Boh. But note well that some you require more tea with certain brands to get the desired strength. That Rain Forest tea in a bit on the weak side.

      • akrasia

        If it was a British colony then it’s education system would apprise the youth of some of Britain’s history and the Commonwealth connection would allow travel and potential ‘advancement’ to the “Mother country’ in a reciprocal arrangement if an African native wanted more than their own country could offer. As has happened.

        If you’re from an African country with no historical connection and Britain is thus alien to your own culture along with all Western Industrialised nations (given that you were educated enough to understand these differences) why would you aspire to come to an alien culture unless motivated to ‘get on’ in some way?
        In which case you would accept it was ‘strange’, learn the local customs to get on and knuckle down.
        People adapt, African’s are just as capable as anybody else so why the special pleading?

        • Pacificweather

          Maybe Richard will enlighten us.

          • Richard

            You will laugh, as is the way with modern Britain, at anything approximating seriousness. This has to do with death of nations. When you grow up as a minority in an African country, with pre-literate people with whom you share almost nothing other than having been born in the same geographical space (as is happening in the UK nowadays), you, and those around you, are defined by your ethnicity and historical origins. Your culture is different from theirs, your desires and dreams in another universe. Moving away from there is not so much a matter as moving from one country to another, as returning to your point of origin.

            It is only in Britain that people of completely different origin, culture, and orientation, are as native as the natives. There is no expected alteration of behaviour, and no common wellspring. No recognition is made of earlier habitation, of historical association with place. Long periods of history, and evolution, and struggle together are dispensed with as easily as a sweet-wrapper in a rubbish-bin. It is a barren wasteland of temporary habitation and rootlessness, a place of pure functionality.

            My conception of myself and sense of place, I think, occupy a very different mentality. There are some who think the way I do, but most modern (indigenous) Brits are the leaves-in-the-wind variety. In mediaeval times, the peasants would climb to the top of Salisbury Cathedral and urinate on the people below. This is a fine metaphor for how modern Britain treats itself.

            Britain has given up on itself as a distinctive entity. It has deconstructed itself into something no different than Pakistan or Somalia, just a sleeping-and-eating-and-procreating entity with no great aspiration, rather like the way Richard II saw kingship in Shakespeare’s play:

            Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood
            With solemn reverence: throw away respect,
            Tradition, form and ceremonious duty,
            For you have but mistook me all this while:
            I live with bread like you, feel want,
            Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus,
            How can you say to me, I am a king?

          • Pacificweather

            Leaving aside that the ‘pre-literate’ Africans have over 270 published authors, some so famous that even I have read books by John Muonye and Chinua Achebe, you said, “It is only in Britain that people of completely different origin, culture and orientation, are as native as the natives.”

            Given the state of the native peoples in North and South America not to mention the antipodes I must say I am rather glad not to be consigned to a reservation or be on the wrong side of a rabbit proof fence.  The Normans weren’t very nice to us it is true but that was a long time ago and most of us have forgiven them.  Were we wrong to do so?

            Having returned from Southern Africa (I don’t get the sense of desert or forest in your words) this quotation  may express your feelings even better.

            Needs must I like it well: I weep for joy
            To stand upon my kingdom once again.
            Dear earth, I do salute thee with my hand,
            Though rebels wound thee with their horses’ hoofs:
            As a long-parted mother with her child
            Plays fondly with her tears and smiles in meeting,
            So, weeping, smiling, greet I thee, my earth,
            And do thee favours with my royal hands.

            But in this “barren wasteland of temporary  habitation and rootlessness” (the re-interment of Richard III being the exception that proves the rule no doubt) perhaps you may hold hope for such good cause as this.

            So when this thief, this traitor, Bolingbroke 
            Who all this while hath revell’d in the night
            Whilst we were wandering with the antipodes,
            Shall see us rising in our throne, the east,
            His treasons will sit blushing in his face,
            Not able to endure the sight of day,

            Unfortunately, the thief and traitor became king and the rest is history (or Shakespeare, not necessarily the same thing). 

            Pissing on the rich has gone out of fashion to be replaced by a mansion tax maybe.  I must agree with you that a certain spark is missing.  I had hoped to see it in the Scots but it was not to be.

          • Richard

            The presence of some writers in Africa (many of whom are excellent) does not alter the fact that it is, as a society, pre-literate. There are cultural threads that accompany literacy, and perhaps even give rise to writing. These were absent in Africa, and so we can refer to the society as pre-literate. In other words, the ability to acquire the technology and mindset of others does not mean one’s own society has had the spurs to create them oneself.

            For instance, Judaism in its origins did not separate out law from religion, much like current Islam. Later Judaism learnt to do this, from Greece and Rome, but it is not native.

            In southern Africa, the indigenous people, the San Bushmen, are living in reservations in the Kalahari Desert. They may not be called such, but that is what they are.

            My point is that, much like what would have greeted people from the Roman provinces when returning to Rome after it had been sacked, what is in Britain today is not “Britain”. It is something else that has replaced it, as the writer of the piece has stated.

          • Pacificweather

            Interestingly, the Chinese are happy to use the technology of others but not the mindset (except for wanting to eat hamburgers). We have the disadvantage of sharing a common language with those who provide much of our technology and so we have also adopted some of their cultural heritage. I guess that was inevitable. When I left Britain for the first time in the 1970s it was a really exiting country with full employment and living wages but the food was terrible and the restaurants limited.

            Now I find the food is great, London is a renewed and vibrant city with masses of cultural activities but so many of those who provide that for us live on wages subsidised by the government. Do I want to live in a country where the government is willing to subsidise employers but not the arts? No, but you have to take the good with the bad. Overall, Britain, for all it’s faults, is still not a bad place to live and the proof of the pudding is that you still live here and haven’t moved on to somewhere with a stronger respect for its past. Though, where that might be escapes me. The British obsession with the past is legendary.

    • Damaris Tighe

      ‘Any reference to anybody’s origins, colour or culture is strictly forbidden: you are expected to have no eyes or ears …’: I’ve noticed this in British tv drama. Presumably in order to have more ethnic minorities (of the right sort) on tv Black & Asian actors are dropped into the most incongruous scenes where their presence is anachronistic & unexplained, giving young people a false view of history.

      One example was Little Dorrit, set in Victorian times of course, which included an industrialist played by an Asian actor. His presence could have been acceptable if at least it was explained & acknowledged … but nothing was said at all, as if the presence of Asian industrialists in Victorian Britain was commonplace & totally unremarkable.

      • Richard

        It’s all part of the same peculiar mentality. They can’t bear that the past was different from the present, and that Britain has indigenous people. In Africa, people know who they are and what they are. As a white person I was “British” and there the end of it, no matter that my family had been there for two generations. Here, one is just “human” and that’s that, with no culture, history, or anything at all. As I say, difference is to be destroyed, and where it is irrefutable (in genetics) it is to be suppressed. It’s like being a Nowhere Man (he said, dating himself).

        • Damaris Tighe

          … or that awful Lennon song ‘Imagine’.

          • Richard

            Perish the thought. I’ll have to have another cup of loose-leaf tea from a warmed teapot to calm myself after that aesthetic challenge to my sensibilities.

          • Damaris Tighe

            Enjoy, Richard – it’s the only proper way to make tea!

          • Old Nick

            But surely you dry the inside of the pot with a clean cloth after pouring away the warming-water.

          • Damaris Tighe

            Ye Olde Englishe Tea Ceremony:

            1) Warm pot
            2) Put in one spoonful of loose tea per person & one for pot
            3) Pour in boiling water
            4) Leave for several minutes
            5) Put milk into cup FIRST

          • Icebow

            Worst song ever, quite possibly.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            “Imagine there`s no heaven…”
            I think John was on to something, although it would hardly make him popular in the Bible belt.

          • Icebow

            I am neither a Christian nor an atheist. The song is vacuous.

      • mohdanga

        There was a play on a few months ago in Toronto about the First Fleet sailing from Britain to Australia in 1789….one of the leads (playing a criminal) was, of course, black. Perfectly representative.

        • Richard

          Bizarre, isn’t it? Yet, try putting a white or any other race into a production of “Porgy and Bess” and you’d think the world is coming to an end.

      • porcelaincheekbones

        rewriting history, but in a period drama everybody notices, it weakens the piece

      • Icebow

        And I recall a black Duke of York in a BBC version of Henry V, if memory serves.

        • country_exile

          That was bloody odd. The Duke of York was not black. It would be like getting a white actor to play Malcolm X.
          And frankly he was awful.

      • Tellytubby

        Part of the problem is that “the past” is owned by the “liberal left” and it has been decided that it is a particularly nasty place because they weren’t in charge then. So when a party such as UKIP come along they are dismissed sneeringly for being “2 old fashioned lolz” and out of touch. They are laughed at by the main stream media for having values out of step with “21st century Britain” unaware of the basic truth that this is actually a good thing. I think it was Clegg himself who said UKIP panders to a Britain that no longer exists. Well there are those amongst us that still believe the heart and soul of Britain can yet be salvaged.

    • barnyard1

      You’re a NIgger, a black POS & remember that. If Africa was so wonderful why are all you Niggers moving to other countries & making ghettos full of crime, fucking everything in sight & having the taxpayers (government) pay for it. Douche bags.

      • Richard

        Might I ask, what precisely does “British descent” mean to you, rude person?

        • barnyard1

          Niggers & Limey’s, all the same. Pu$$y boys, now go home & blow your dog.

          • tbusby3

            Hi everyone. This comment made it past the moderators.
            Hooray!!

          • barnyard1

            Fuck the moderators, this is freedom of speech. Want mods, go live in Russia.

          • tbusby3

            In Soviet Russia, moderators fuck you.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            But in YUCK they just fuck with you.

          • barnyard1

            Wonderful if you’re a fag…..I prefer pu$$y myself.

          • barnyard1

            Cunt, cunt, that’s what a man want’s.

          • barnyard1

            Really, you must get laid a lot then pecker head.

          • Richard

            What is the point of your making comments here? Discourse does not consist of what you write, which is more like the writing on toilet-walls and graffiti.

          • barnyard1

            Fuck you, your Momma, wife sister , brother & dog……Leave your old man out of it because all the former I mentioned drive his ass to drink & fuck prostitutes…..Prostitutes is good pu$$y man.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Would you feel rather more at home on Guido? Just don`t slag off the bead mumblers.

          • barnyard1

            Send me your sister to rape or you Mom to Butt fuck, I like tight bleeding holes as I’m large.

    • country_exile

      Brilliantly put.

      • Richard

        Thank you, I thought so too. I shall have to write a book called “Audience of One” and dedicate it to you.

  • logdon

    Imagine how I feel at 68?

    However I have just moved to rural Monmouthshire where time slows down and change seems positively snail-like.

    Just the way I like it, these days.

  • Dauer_Gast

    It’s what happens when a cosmopolitan political “elite” decides to give the country away (citizens’ agreement not required) and to destroy its identity. If it makes you feel better, the same happened in the rest of Europe as well.

    • styants64

      Yes but in what was Britain they went overboard by selling off most of the countries assets to foreign buyers quite often on the cheap like Jaguar Land Rover the mini cadburys ICI the railway system water gas electricity the British ruling elite actually always hated their own people and now they hate the country or so it seems.

      • tbusby3

        You’re right, it’s horrible when foreigners have money. Burn the foreigners. Burn the money.

        • styants64

          Your ignorance is no excuse that’s all that could be said about your post.

          • tbusby3

            I don’t know what this means.

            Also, if you look slightly to the left of the full stop on your keyboard, there is a comma. This will allow you to type in a way that other people can read without wanting to jam forks in their eyes.

          • styants64

            Like I said you are just displaying your ignorance in understanding Britain’s structural problems, I had a couple of of upticks so some are using their forks to eat with bye click bait Troll.

          • tbusby3

            You used a comma! My work here is done.

        • Jackthesmilingblack

          Better start being nice to the immigrants. You might be working for one before long.

          • tbusby3

            I am working for one.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        Jaguar, Land Rover.
        You tried the Cowboys, now try the Indians.

  • styants64

    The NHS from my experience treats the patient from a distance they do not like the idea that the individual can have an opinion on what might be wrong with them, it took 37yrs for me to get correct diagnosis on a life long condition that was slowly destroying me, and then it was only after I told them what I thought it was after reading the case of a girl in a newspaper in a magazine with the same health problems.

  • EHGombrich

    I´ve gone into an inner emigration and I was born in the mid 1980s. But one can still live well.

  • tbusby3

    It’s just all so bloody worrying isn’t it James! What with all the females having their own points of view, and new generations having dialect their parents don’t understand. Change is scary!

    • Richard

      Females have had their own points of view for a long time. English in the UK is degenerating, make no mistake, into a sort of Jamaican patois. It has lost its ability to communicate many things, and as used in the UK has also lost much of its ability to transmit culture. This has not happened with, say, German.

      There is a big difference between saying (1) all change is good and the past is always worse, and (2) that some change is good, and the past was not always worse. You seem to be inclined to (1).

      • tbusby3

        The past is always worse. I can’t fathom why parents disciplined their children by hitting them, or why homosexuality was punishable by imprisonment. I’m sure my future children will be equally baffled by the sheer number of times American police officers shot unarmed black teenagers.

        The key is that we are completely unable to have things “as they were”, so why the hell try?

        Nobody ever lay on their deathbed, wishing they’d spent more time complaining about change. Get amongst it, eff the haters and enjoy your weekend. Maybe try zorbing.

        • Richard

          Well, I see far, far more starvation in Africa than I did in my youth. I see far more death from illness. I see far more broken marriages. I see youth who no longer question, but simply want not to be challenged. I see a retreat into comfort and self-obsession, instead of challenge and exploration. I see a narcissistic society eating up the capital left to its by its forebears. You may not see that, because you cannot compare, but we have begun that long road back to the primeval swamp.

          • Sam

            Good news, Richard! Hunger in Africa is on a long-term decline.

            http://www.vox.com/2014/11/24/7272929/charts-thankful

          • tbusby3

            That’s my shit. Good work Sam.

          • Richard

            Thanks, I am certain, to food-aid. You need to go to Africa to see that. There are also, in South Africa at least, far more deaths at police hands than was the case during apartheid, and greater unemployment. You see vast fields of graves caused by AIDS deaths, all preventable, but engendered by the elected governments since 1994.

            The trouble is, people interpret through ideology. The UK has become very ideological, seeing everything through Leftist spectacles. Each ideology presents its coming-to-fruition as the culmination of history, of the attainment of the road to nirvana (if not the actual realisation of nirvana). The present is no better than any other epoch, worse, by my reckoning, because it is so very self-satisfied. It chooses to ignore what contradicts its claims, and in so-doing does not deal with the problems that surround us. It is akin to using cosmetics to cover over a cancer, that the light should not reveal the truth.

          • Sam

            OK — but are you not given pause by the fact that the reality is the opposite of what you thought? There’s actually far, far LESS starvation in Africa than in your youth. Do you wonder if your other doomladen observations are also not grounded in facts?

          • Richard

            Is this reduction in hunger sustainable? Is it “better” to have to send vast amounts of food to a continent to keep its population alive? What is “better” about it? I do not believe in dissembling. It never helped anyone in the long run.

          • Sam

            It’s better because that way they don’t starve. Where does leftist ideology come into it?

          • Richard

            Ethiopia’s population has quadrupled owing to food aid from the West. Do you really think it’s a good idea simply to keep on doing this?

          • Sam

            Your original comment was “Well, I see far, far more starvation in Africa than I did in my youth.” I pointed out this was wrong — now you’re saying that the lack of starvation is regrettable because it’s causing overpopulation. Can you find a similar negative for the declining trend in infant mortality for example? Or in global poverty?

            You should consider the possibility that a) things are not as bad as you think, and b) none of this is in any way related to leftist ideology or Western self-satisfaction

          • Richard

            In nature, during lean times in Africa, animals do not breed, or have fewer offspring. That is how we are created. Africans don’t seem to care about that, and huge numbers of them would die each year of starvation, if not for the intervention of others. They need to take control of their numbers. What makes you think that that sort of behaviour is desirable? Their population is out of all proportion to what the land can sustain. It is ridiculous. It is causing massive soil erosion and environmental despoliation.

            If you are too stupid to limit your numbers to what you can afford, it’s not up to others to pick up the pieces.

          • Sam

            There is almost no discernible thread of logic to your remarks. Initially you were saying we were on a “long road back to that primeval swamp” owing to various negative trends, of which starvation in Africa is one. I challenged you on that, and instead of responding directly to my remarks now you are saying something about how Africans have an unnatural urge to breed, which is irrelevant as well as racist-sounding.

            I’m not sure it’s possible for us to have a constructive dialogue because I can’t tell what your argument is. The world is going to hell because Africans are given too much food?

          • Mr B J Mann

            As well as there now being 100 million starving in Ethiopia when, a century ago, there were only 5 million starving there:

            In the 60’s Malaria had been almost eradicated from Africa.

            Now, thanks to the bleedin-heart, care-sharey, PC, woolley-liberals how many children, never mind adults, die from Malaria every year in Aftrica?!

          • Sam

            Being honest with yourself Mr B J Mann, to what extent does your your analysis reflect a thorough and even-handed examination of the facts, and to what extent is it just you mindlessly sounding off about liberals?

          • Mr B J Mann

            Being honest with yourself Sam, to what extent does your “reply” reflect a lack of any analysis, never mind thorough and even-handed examination of the facts in my post, and to what extent is it just you mindlessly sounding off about people who object to bigots and nanny-state control freaks styling themselves “liberals”?

          • Mr B J Mann

            A century ago there were around 5 million people starving in Ethiopia.

            Now, thanks to the trendy-lefty, carey-sharey, bleedin-heart, PC, woolley-liberals:

            There are about a 100 million starving Ethiopians!

          • tbusby3

            You have to understand that you see these things more now because you can. We have never had the ability to be as globally aware as we are right now.

            It looks like the second half of your comment is complaining that young people don’t do the same things they did when you were young. This is the most natural reaction in the world, and you have to fight it with every fibre of your being. I have a 9 year old niece who uses SnapChat – I have no fucking idea what the hell I’m supposed to do with SnapChat, but if I start reacting negatively towards it, imagine how crazy I’ll get when the robots take over. You have to go with the flow.

            Also at some point in there you use the phrase “to its by its” which is fantastic.

          • Richard

            This modern belief that things are better now, and that everything should be interpreted according to current mores, is nothing other than narcissism. There is nothing more ridiculous than observing in retrospect people who believe they are “cutting edge” and fashionable.

            I don’t think anybody claims that all change is bad. What I do think is that to insist that all change is good is vapid and, to me, disquieting. It shows a lack of engagement with the human condition in favour of the expedient.

          • tbusby3

            You can throw around fancy words like “nothing”, “current” and “claims” as much as you like, but you have to see that every single person, ever, as felt this way.

            I’m not trying to say that the past was bad (although it often was). I’m also not saying that now is perfect (it definitely isn’t). What I’m saying is that NOW is all we have.

            Pakistani dentists, easily accessible online pornography, RyanAir, energy drinks, video games, Tinder, fridges that are inexplicably online. All that shit is here to stay. Use it or don’t use it. But to fret about it is an abominable waste of time.

          • Richard

            The current mental dispensation in the UK has it that the past is incontrovertibly evil, and that we are much better off in the sort of society we have now. I repudiate that. Fret about it I do not, I merely reveal it for the cant that it is. There is the whiff of totalitarianism about it.

            I am all in favour of scientific development. There is a discipline in which the past is revered for its attempts to come to grips with reality and problems. However, we live in a land in which the worship of Leftist ideology, twinned in many ways with anti-science, flourishes.

            In any event, I am not certain that you grasp the thrust of my arguments, which perhaps is illustrative of the debate itself. The future is not turning out, in my mind, to be any sort of an improvement or any sort of elevation of humanity. It is turning into an overcrowded, retrogressive, unintelligent hedonism. But then perhaps we never shall transcend our baser selves.

          • tbusby3

            I dunno man. Have you seen some of that easily accessible online pornography I talked about earlier? S’pretty sweet.

          • Cyril Sneer

            Well said.

        • mohdanga

          “I’m sure my future children will be equally baffled by the sheer number of times American police officers shot unarmed black teenagers.” Which has happened once in the past year and the poor black ‘child’ who was shot was a 300 lb drug addled thug trying to get the officer’s gun. But carry on.

          • tbusby3

            Dude this happened more than once.

          • mohdanga

            So it has, as have instances of black police officers shooting whites, which get basically zero coverage in the mainstream media because we know that when a white police officer shoots a black it’s 100% due to racism and not protecting himself while when a black officer shoots an unarmed white it’s ‘doing his job’.
            Note any differences after the shootings below?? No riots, no violent protests, no worldwide media attention of racist police officers, no immediate massive FBI investigation by Eric Holder or Obumbler.

            http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/aug/25/critics-see-racial-double-standard-in-coverage-of-/?page=all

            http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/nov/27/white-teen-gilbert-collar-killed-by-black-cop-trev/?page=2

          • tbusby3

            It’s almost like one side of this situation wasn’t precluded by centuries of slavery, abuse and rights violations. We should probably remove context from all the news, in the hopes that this makes things more accurate.

          • mohdanga

            What ‘slavery, abuse and rights violations’ did Michael Brown experience? He’s 150 years + removed from this (assuming he had ancestors that were slaves). As an 18 year old he had been able to live as freely as anyone else of any other colour. The immediate assumption by blacks that the officer is racist is, in fact, racist. Because there were white slave owners in the 1800s this automatically means that the white officer is racist….rrrriiiight……

          • tbusby3

            The assumption that the white officer was racist comes from the fact that he shot an unarmed black man who may or may not have been surrendering.

            Saying that MB lived as freely as anyone else is a gross lack of awareness of racism in the US (and the world).

          • mohdanga

            And yet the grand jury, of which several members were black, absolved the officer of any wrong doing. They must have been in the pay of whitey. Witnesses said Brown reached in the car to try and get the officer’s gun…so while he may have been ‘unarmed’ he was certainly not intent on remaining that way.
            And ‘racism’ now means defending yourself from a 300 lb thug trying to shoot you with your own gun? Police officers are allowed to shoot attackers if they feel their lives are in danger….doesn’t matter if the person has a knife, gun or bat. If he had his hands around the officer’s throat trying to strangle him would it have been ‘racist’ to shoot him? Why is that automatic assumption that a black being shot is due to ‘racism’?
            How do you know how freely Brown lived? You automatically assume that Brown lived in a racist society because of your pre-conceived notions of how racist the US is. Isn’t this the definition of prejudice? Was he prevented from going to school, working, shopping, voting or doing anything else? No. Not wanting to take advantage of opportunities open to you is not ‘racism’, it’s stupidity.

          • tbusby3

            So black people are stupid. Nice.

          • mohdanga

            Where did I say that? I said that not taking advantage of opportunities open to you is stupidity, it has nothing to do with some imagined racism. Blacks have opportunities open to them just like every other race. But the lack of logic in your response indicates you have no facts to back this up so you toss out some inane comment. Carry on.

          • tbusby3

            Shouldn’t say blacks.

          • mohdanga

            Why not? Is this not politically correct? Better tell these (and thousands of other organizations) then:

            http://www.blackpolice.org/

            http://www.nbpa.co.uk/

            http://bsa.rice.edu/

            http://www.cabl.ca/

          • tbusby3

            “Black” is fine, but “blacks” sounds pretty rough. Same way you shouldn’t say “Jews” or “Arabs” or “Women”. Best to stick to just “people”. That way you don’t immediately pigeonhole people based on the thing you notice first.

          • mohdanga

            Well, maybe in your enlightened, progressive world this is how things work….out here in the real world I think I’ll still call a woman a woman, which I didn’t realize was ‘offensive’.

          • tbusby3

            If by now you haven’t realised this is trolling, then I don’t know what to do. I’m out of ideas and about to go home. Thanks for the chat.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Works best in South African dialect.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Last year in the US, some 1,100 people were killed by the police, mostly shot.

        • mohdanga

          Today is so much better….people imprisoned for tweeting or hauled up for singing ‘Kung Fu Fighting’ at a karaoke night.

        • Mr B J Mann

          tbusby3 -> Richard:
          “The past is always worse. I can’t fathom why parents disciplined their children by hitting them, or why homosexuality was punishable by imprisonment. I’m sure my future children will be equally baffled by the sheer number of times………”

          Trendy-lefty, bleedin-heart, PC, woolly-liberals insist that homosexuality is natural because animals do it.

          But insist that the physical chastisement animals make their offspring “suffer” is banned for humans.

          Not to mention rape, killing and eating your step-children, wounding and killing your opponents……..

          Oh, nearly forgot:

          Killing and eating other species!

          • tbusby3

            Homosexuality is natural because 10% of the population do it. Nothing the fuck to do with animals.

          • Mr B J Mann

            So WTF do so many trendy-lefty, bleedin-heart, PC, woolly-liberals insist that homosexuality is natural because animals do it?

            And where do you get your 10% figure from?!

            Oh, and while it might be “natural”, if only 10% of the population do it, and the other 90% do the same other thing:

            It’s not “normal”.

            Happy now?!

          • tbusby3

            I don’t insist that it’s natural because animals do it.

            Nor does my heart bleed. That sounds medically serious.

            Data’s pretty hard to come by, as lots of people (especially outside UK and US) feel they can’t express their views on it out of fear. Do some Googling and tell me if I’m way off.

            There are fewer smokers than non-smokers – should we outlaw smoking and tell all smokers they aren’t normal?

          • Mr B J Mann

            tbusby3 -> Mr B J Mann
            “I don’t insist that it’s natural because animals do it.”

            I didn’t say you did.

            I asked “WTF do so many trendy-lefty, bleedin-heart, PC, woolly-liberals insist that”

            tbusby3
            “Nor does my heart bleed. That sounds medically serious.”

            But if the cap fits, feel free to don it.

            tbusby3
            “Data’s pretty hard to come by, as lots of people (especially outside UK and US) feel they can’t express their views on it out of fear. Do some Googling and tell me if I’m way off.”

            Now when I was a young lad down the smoke, and spent much of my time in gay bars (with the missus, I might add), a leftie MP who lean’t that way of our acquaintance insisted that a third of MPs were “openly” gay, though most hadn’t officially come out of the closet, and if they hadn’t, no one officially referred to it, including the press.

            He also claimed another third were also gay, but refused to admit it.

            So on that score you’re miles out.

            Even happier now?!?!

            As for smokers, the last time I looked we hadn’t banned paying tobacco duty.

            But to all intents and purposes smoking is banned, including in private vans used for work if colleagues might travel in them, private cars if kids ever travel in them, in parks n ospitals (such that nurses have to go out of the grounds and get stabbed to death if they’re dying for a fag (of the tobacco, not gay, variety), private homes if the neighbours complain the smoke is filtering through party walls or through windows into their homes, and even pedestrian precincts.

            And to think we (the public, I don’t smoke, hate smoke, but do love liberty) were promised, after the pubs had provide segregated areas for non smokers, then provided segregated areas for smokers and installed £BILLIONS worth of extraction and filtration equipment, that we could have a vote on whether we wanted smoking and non-smoking pubs.

            And, guess what, if there is any evidence of passive smoking affecting health, it doesn’t affect adults, and the only effect on children seems to be that it IMPROVES their health?!?!?!!?

            Yet because there are fewer smokers than non-smokers, and more do-gooding nanny-staters than common sense – we HAVE effectively outlawed smoking and the anti liberty, sorry, pro elf, brigade do tell all smokers they aren’t normal!

            Next!

          • tbusby3

            That smoking one got pretty intense towards the end there. I guess it’s better you vent here; hopefully it’ll save you snapping and killing your cat or something.

            I think somewhere in there you mention that passive smoke improves children’s health, so I’m probably never going to return here.

            May you continue to love liberty.

          • Mr B J Mann

            So, you don’t understand statistics.

            Can’t formulate a reasoned response.

            And have to make do with ad hominems.

            Maybe it’s best you don’t return here.

            Or something……..

          • tbusby3

            Comment threads – the home of statistics and the reasoned response.

            Cheers buddy, and thanks for the chat.

          • Mr B J Mann

            A reasoned response, I suppose, if you can’t summon up any relevant statistics, and have all run out of ad hominems.

      • Sam

        “English in the UK is degenerating, make no mistake, into a sort of Jamaican patois. It has lost its ability to communicate many things, and as used in the UK has also lost much of its ability to transmit culture.”

        This is factually wrong and linguistically ignorant. The reality is that language changes all the time and some people don’t like it. That’s all there is to it.

        • Mr B J Mann

          Yes, it changes.

          It can change for the better, improve, expand, develop.

          Or it can degenerate.

          As you could only retort that language changes all the time, rather than explain that it had developed and improved, you are obviously aware that it really is degenerating.

          As someone once said:

          “Being honest with yourself Sam, to what extent does your “reply” reflect a lack of any analysis, never mind thorough and even-handed examination of the facts in [his] post, and to what extent is it just you mindlessly sounding off about people who…..”

          Tell it like it is?!

  • greggf

    Britain is going the same way as Venezuela.

    Chavez used to boast about his “Socialism of the 21st Century” a slogan which Ed might use were Hollande’s ruinous example not next door. Still he talks about a fundamental transformation of the country, promising extensive rights and benefits to the downtrodden, radically changing private industries and re-empowering nationalized services as per the SNP’s wishes.

    Of course most of this has already happened James as you describe, so Miliband is just echoing what we already know. or “reinforcing” it.

    Like Venezuela Britain will become a basket case: low productivity, little value -added manufacture, dependent on Petroleum resources, an economy dominated by services and Welfare etc. The drop in the Oil price, inter alia, means that even Cameron’s policies can only slow the slide.

    Apart from the evident social consequences there are financial concerns. Our currency, £, has shown significant weakness since Broon’s crisis in 2007/9. It settled at new low levels whilst the coalition took steps to recover the economy but now, with the prospect of another Labour administration looming, it is falling anew.

    Our unmentioned Socialist experiment is coming home to the people….

  • evad666

    During the last Labour Government 4827 young underage white children abused by muslims spread across 35 English Towns and Cities.
    Vote Labour to support your local islamic paedo gang.

  • boultonzz .

    Whilst I entire agree with this piece, I am confused about the Spectator’s stance on immigration. Just the other day there was a piece on here telling us all how horrible UKIP are. UKIP for me, are the only party who will stand up for traditional British values, which I strongly believe starts with regaining control of the borders.
    Given the unbelievable mess we’re in and the extremes that the LibLabCon boys have got us in by, reducing the total number of English people here, I strongly believe in repatriating those who don’t have UK citizenship. Give us back our English communities; let us have a vote on the membership of the EU. If the EU is unwillingly to budge on the free movement principle, then I for one, am in favour of saying thanks, but no thanks, we’re do our own thing.

  • artemis in france

    There’s only one way around this problem, James, and that is to, as far as possible, stick with your own peer group. I’m 65 and believe me even some of them are so p.c. it’s frightening. I find the people who I get on with best tend to be hard smoking, hard drinking types, like Clarkson I suppose, even though I’ve not smoked for décades and drink moderately.

  • Sam

    “Perhaps I’m maligning my scary young dentist woman, but I can just imagine her glaring her disapproval at such a patently demeaning and racist line of inquiry. She probably thinks I’m Colonel Blimp.”

    James — you ARE Colonel Blimp. Except Colonel Blimp probably understood the difference between political correctness and health and safety legislation

    • Cleisthenes

      Not fair Sam
      Colonel Blimp was at the very least terribly British without trying, not a social climber who believes that by acting as Colonel Blimp he being being a proper Englishman! Delingpole – the type of man who never gets invited shooting and when he finally does probably writes an article about it!

  • The Sceptic

    Another excellent read, Mr. Delingpole. Ask any young adult about the works of Elgar, Hogarth, Vaughan Williams, Tennyson, Wordsworth or Kipling, and they will look at you perplexed. Or ask them to recount the story of Cain and Abel, or tell them about the ubiquity of singing the national anthem and popular hymns at schools, and you will be met with incredulity.

    The erasure of our culture and customs – the underpinning of our success – must, surely, be the most destructive act this nation has had inflicted upon it.

    • Sam

      You must be fun at family gatherings.

      The Sceptic: Good morrow my young adult nephew! Please do me the kindness of recounting the story of Cain and Abel.

      *Young person looks perplexed*

      The Sceptic: No? A disquisition on the ubiquity of singing popular hymns at schools, perhaps?

      Young person: Er…

      The Sceptic: (weeping) O Albion! O tarnished splendour!

      • Richard

        I liked the repartee, but must say the character of “Young person” didn’t engage me. It lacked definition, and didn’t have the necessary insouciance.

        Had “Young person” said something like, “Wazzup, grandad. Yo!” and then “What is this sh*t, man? Where’s my Playstation?” it would have had verisimilitude, and the veracity of a great work.

        “The Sceptic”, though, was a man after my own heart. However, even there, it could have commenced with “The Sceptic, fresh from his London club:…”

      • Cyril Sneer

        A response that is not a response to the valid points raised, just a meandering insult.

        You add nothing to the discussion.

        • Sam

          To be honest with you Mr Sneer, I didn’t find the claim that our culture is being erased because young people aren’t reading enough Kipling or singing enough hymns to be really worth addressing. As a particularly comical example of peevish snobbery, though, I couldn’t resist poking fun a little bit.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            Take up the white man`s burden
            Send forth the best you breed …

      • vieuxceps2

        Sam, I suspect you’re” the one who thinks he’s fun at family gatherings”

    • Resnonverba59

      Frankfurt School, Cultural Marxism, Common Purpose, UN Agenda 21. READ ALL ABOUT IT.

  • Ambientereal

    Well, British law makers are irrational since at least four decades. Laws are not protecting the British identity but they do with the foreign cultures, as in some other articles was already stated, we are committing cultural suicide and there is no way back from it. In the new elections, the preservation of the British culture must be as important as the preservation of the economy.

  • jaz

    “Our youth now love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for their elders and love chatter in place of exercise; they no longer rise when elders enter the room; they contradict their parents, chatter before company; gobble up their food and tyrannize their teachers.” — Socrates

    All Delingpole is doing is moaning about the young. Something that generations of far far better writers than he have done for millennia.

    It does amuse me seeing Delingpole re-invent himself, from the media and then arts correspondent of the DT to this hackneyed “country gent” act, as he now describes himself.

    • Richard

      Not really. There is more to it than that. His generation saw their parents as old-fashioned, but the difference was much less, and the same with their parents. The disconnect between modern youth and their parents is much greater, because of mass immigration and consequent cultural change. Of course, it is Dellingpole’s generation that brought all this about, but the point remains.

      • jaz

        I am sorry, you have completely lost me. What has immigration got to do with it? How has that affected the connection between “modern youth and their parents”? Every generation thinks they live in unique times.

        • Richard

          The cultural continuity is lost. Zulus fifty years after the defeat of Cetshwayo had a cultural disconnect from what it meant to be a Zulu. That is what happens in war, and mass immigration is like the aftermath of a war. Historically, it has only happened in defeated states.

          • vieuxceps2

            But we it seems, have managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.Yes,hackneyed I know, but a pithy way to express the sorowful pity of our plight.

          • Mr B J Mann

            You can’t mention the jaws!

          • jaz

            “mass immigration is like the aftermath of a war.” This statement shows that there is little point in continuing. Thank you for the exchange of views.

        • vieuxceps2

          “What has immigration got to do with it?”-a great deal,I’d say. Do you think you can change the people of a nation and expect the nation to be the same as it was? The people ARE the nation, change them and you have something different.Hence,Goodbye England.

    • Mr B J Mann

      All you’ve done is prove that the decline started a long time ago and explained why we have fallen so far!

  • JoeCro

    Medium rare steak fine, medium rare burger is a no-no, the mincing process mixes the food poisoning causing organisms throughout the meat, meaning it has to be properly cooked, whereas a steak has the micro-organisms on the outside only meaning the meat inside does not have to be fully cooked.

    • Richard

      But just what sort of place do you frequent?

      • JoeCro

        Undercooked burgers are a health hazard wherever they are made.

  • redsquirrel

    I know a couple barely in their 30’s that feel like this. They just moved back to Australia after a year home in England. Too much cultural politics and islamic nonsense. These aren’t grumpy old right wingers like us (well, you lot) or skin head thugs. These are nice middle class normal people with good jobs.

    • Richard

      Britain isn’t for sissies, I’ll tell you that much. You have to be strong-minded to keep your self-respect living here. The world outside your own house is vindictive and petty, and out to get you.

      • redsquirrel

        you have your OWN house? these people are 30. they don’t own their own house dude. I said good jobs, you know lawyers and such. Not bank robbers.

        • Richard

          Own house can imply rented, too.

      • Jackthesmilingblack

        Alternatively, a risk averse loser washed up on the UK beach with the rest of the trash. The flotsam and jetsam of the stream of life.
        Jack, Japan Alps

  • Cyril Sneer

    I’m 40, work in IT, I can recall this country being a damn sight happier and better 20 years ago.

    The change has been without a doubt for the worse.

    It matters to me because I have an 8 year old daughter and I want her and her children to inherit a country worth inheriting. The way it’s going I will recommend for her to emigrate first opportunity she gets when she’s old enough.

    • Jenny_Tells

      Out of curiosity, where to? Australia seems to be more politically correct than Britain is. Or perhaps, life in the EU – soon to be called Eurabia. The Far East may be an option, but there would be significant culture shock involved.

      • mohdanga

        I don’t think Australia is more PC. They have a good number of PC, nanny state enforcers in the media and politics but they haven’t yet succumbed to unbridled, unchecked immigration and dopiness that the UK has. Still, it’s not like it was in the 80s…..

      • Resnonverba59

        Cyril has survived the culture shock in the UK. His daughter will with luck.

        • Cyril Sneer

          Cyril didn’t want the culture shock, Cyril was very happy with his country 20 years ago. Liberalism not required, political correctness not required, racial self hating liberals not required, special organisations purely for a particular skin colour not required,

          Progressive Liberalism = division in all forms – racial, social, religious etc etc

          • Richard

            There is much to be said for this posting.

          • Resnonverba59

            I’m with you Cyril.

          • Jackthesmilingblack

            So hate it and leave it.
            Jack, Japan Alps

      • David

        New Zealand is still just about sane. Not exactly the world’s most exciting place, though…

        • Dragblacker

          Oh I don’t know, those dragons and armies of orcs keep things exciting 😉

      • Callipygian

        Well, hello! Lots of Brits are living in <a href=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjz5qtOuWfUCanada and America…

      • Cyril Sneer

        New Zealand would be my first choice but yes it is indeed a question of ‘where to’. Where that hasn’t been inflicted with progressive liberal racial self hatred.

    • David

      I think one of the reasons for this general direction of travel is the fact that we no longer have the Soviet Union as a living, dystopian reminder of just where Ed Miliband would take us if he – and his cronies (many of whom are even more awful than he) came to power. We never had the absurd ‘hate speech’ law in the eighties because it would have been unthinkable in (what we used to call) “the free West”.

  • The ironic element here is that the left wing mindset cling to the BBC because they think it is what holds their society together and binds them to the past.
    In fact it is the dynamic that is most destroying our society, definitely the cancer within from which many of our politicians evolve.

  • barnyard1

    The young Millennial’s today, not all but a good bunch think anybody over forty is very old. The little pricks have yet to really do anything with their lives & want to tell me how to run mine…..SMD or better yet, suck my dick. I served in Vietnam, ran a business, raised four children & eventually got cancer & heart disease all components of our greddy fuc’kg Con Agra, Dupont, Monsanto agriculture in the way they can increase profits through bullshit radiation & genetics. I want these little pricks to are condemning us seniors to try & that word TRY is big for them to stop being so selfish & thinking like they are never going to die or that dying is so far away in the future they don’t need to worry…….Azzholes, it comes like a bad case of diarrhea in a location with no toilet. Good luck, not really.

  • David

    Reflecting on something James said on Twitter, I am reminded of the anthem for my generation (I am 48 now) – The Human League’s brilliant ‘Dare’ LP. Something of a manifesto for young people in the eighties, the opening track declares – in a swathe of uplifting synthesiser chords, “everybody needs love and adventure, everybody needs cash to spend”…

    Now it seems this would be more apposite, “everybody needs enforced social egalitarianism, everybody needs the right to spend other people’s money, everybody needs to pursue their own ethnic customs and cultural practices regardless of those of the country they now reside in…” Welcome to the new age of cultural austerity, stripped bare of ambition, aspiration and the power of dreams!

    • Sam

      Where is this socially egalitarian place and how can I move there?

      • Terry Field

        The Gobi. It is hell for all forms of life.

  • edithgrove

    If you think we are in trouble now just Imagine what the next generation of iphoned, headphoned, facebooked zombies will be like.

    • Sam

      People who are interested in listening to music and socialising?

      • edithgrove

        if you call dating a mobile phone socialising then yes

        • Sam

          You realise phones and facebook are both used to communicate with other humans right?

          • Terry Field

            You are clearly delusional.

  • averagebritain

    I must correct your line of enquiry, Mr. Delingpole, because it is flawed:
    Unless one is completely eccentric, the dentist’s chair is not the place to expect to hold a proper conversation. It is a place to get into, and out of, as soon as possible

  • styants64

    Why don’t you add something to the debate about the structural problems that are going to evolve into a crisis within Britain’s unequal society,I recommend you watch will hutton with his program selling off Britain you might catch it on channel four catch up, Britain has now become an increasingly low-wage high cost place to live which in the end will lead to increasing social problems with the younger generation not feeling they’ve got any investment in the future.

    • Terry Field

      It is unequal, because many have no skills, no education, no motivation and nothing much to offer, old cocker.
      As ever.
      As always will be the case.

      • styants64

        Bullshite I meet many who have education and skills but right now will never be able to purchase a home at today’s prices a lot of our finest have left to live in the the like of Australia I have visited and worked in oz currently there are over 1 million briits that have left and are now living and working in Australia apart from all the predecessors this country has lost some of its finest and now future looks bleak.

        • Terry Field

          Oh come on!
          For every skilled frustrated motivated working person in Britoland there are two or three anglo-saxon-culture generated slobs who are good for almost nothing. It is a hallmark of the culture.

          • styants64

            Over twenty deaths from Stabbings and shootings most of the in Londons innercity areas in January alone where I live away from that mess among decent Anglo’s we have a very low crime rate most of England used to be same then we have been swamped by Third World retard’s of the worst kind, the educated and intelligent third world people should of stayed there because the third world needs them more than we did.

          • Terry Field

            Indeed. I worked with a bunch of african immigrants. After getting to know them they showed me the market where bush meat was on sale. A new barbarian collapse not any longer recoverable. I left and thank God I did. You poor sod; why on earth do you stay?????

          • styants64

            Where I live it’s ok same for my relatives and live away from the mess, it’s history repeated a once successful nation goes into self destruct just like classical Rome and Greece.

          • Terry Field

            The collapse is now unavoidable. 1.6 trillion debt.
            Finished. Squalor and violence is unavoidable.

  • trace9

    Instant Peach Melba from Whittards. A stimulant for any morning tongue. As for the mourning tongue above – & Then There’s The Weather, Too! – add some shells for more of those Dastardly Deniers, willya?

    • Terry Field

      I would swap that chemi-junk for excellent caviar any day.
      Or oysters; or spey salmon.
      All in decline in the poisoned little patch.
      Mercifully, in my adopted abode, all are in good supply.

  • Iain Inkster

    Interesting that the author does not comment on whether this government’s education reforms may turn things around

  • James

    Hackney Carriages revoke licenses from drivers who ‘offend’ passengers by displaying the Union Jack or St George flag. Why do people come here if it offends them so much?

    • Muttley

      Because they want to live in the s**thole they come from but be rich at the same time. They fail to understand that eventually their values will turn it into another poverty-stricken midden. Hopefully at that stage they will move on and wreck somewhere else.

  • Terry Field

    I can think of no aspect of British life that has not gone down the toilet since 1945.
    Except anaesthesia, and that is something one needs on a daily basis to survive the bloody horror of it all.

  • Bozza ‘n’ Dave

    This is too much miserable catering to the depressed OAP soul for my liking.
    Come on boys and girls – there’s an election to fight – visionary stuff happnin’ – get out there and turn yourself into a herd.

  • Muttley

    I think this happens to every generation when they get old. But the difference now is that it is happening to people at a much younger age. Towards the very end of her life, my grandmother, aged 102 and who had embraced the many improvements to life in the 20th century, nonetheless began to feel that we had taken a wrong turn.

    Now, 50 year-olds are feeling the same thing. Younger people increasingly accept change for change’s sake, not necessarily because it is for the better but because they have been taught to think in certain ways which make independent thought impossible for them. They must swim with the tide and accept group-think ot they will be stigmatised and rejected by their peers.

  • brwsing

    Utterly lazy and banal polemic on topics which deserve more serious attention. Where is the substance? There is none. Expressing nothing more than emotion through crap anecdotes to help explain our collective reality. The writer cannot see beyond his own, everything he experiences has a confirmation bias.

    If the dumbing down of education is supposed to encapsulate a devaluation of critical thinking and ease of accomplishment, what exactly has Delingpole intelligently demonstrated here in the 30 minutes it took him to write this trite (from the conversation he no doubt had down the pub and recorded on his iPhone).

  • Alto Berto

    Oh Dellypole, it’s a pity you didn’t you ask your negro friend if he and his children didn’t take advantage of the US welfare & AA policies for blacks. Though such programs are for the decedents of US African American slaves, black immigrants from all over having no problem living high on the hog and then kicking the piglets. The animosity within the various American “black” communities, I assure you, goes every which way for every which reason. As to your “friend” him and his family are niggers when they need to be. Guarantee ya three generations in and 9 times out of 10 they’ll all assimilate with middle class Trayvon Martins every time. You’ve a delusional vision of the world (or at least America).

    P.S. This:

    “There was a letter to the Daily Telegraph last weekend which depressed me more than anything I’ve read in ages. It reported the visit by a social worker to an elderly woman who made her a cup of tea. The young social worker was shocked by what she saw. Not only did this bewildered old woman insist on using leaves rather than a bag but she first poured some hot water into the pot, swirled it round, then wasted it by putting it straight down the sink. Here, clearly, was evidence that grandma was incapable of looking after herself and should be put into care immediately.

    This put me in mind of another experience I had recently. I was having dinner with a group of friends in an upmarket London pub and we all wanted our burgers cooked medium rare. ‘They won’t allow it,’ said a local friend in the know. ‘We’re under Westminster Council jurisdiction, here.’ Sure enough, when the time to order came we had to beg and plead with the manager for our burgers not be overcooked, as local health laws now require.

    It also reminded me of my recent adventures with my dentist, a clearly bright, well-spoken girl in her twenties of, I’m guessing, Pakistani extraction. She obviously knows all her stuff but I can’t stand her. The problem is that she has the most appalling dental-chair-side manner. She’s officious, patronising, fully bought-into the NHS programme, whereby every patient is a statistic rather than a real person. It seems never to have occurred to her that the way you address an educated, middle-aged country gent might need to be slightly different from the way, say, you speak to a porcine 15-year-old chav.”

    I can’t agree with you more. God damnit, no one has respect for tradition anymore!

    Disgraceful. The young treat that which is old, that which is ancient like shit. Just look at how I treated you.

    PPS: Every conservative, even pseudo-conservatives (read “liberals”) such as yourself, should read this: http://www.constitution.org/jjr/poland.htm

    After reading that essay I have to say that I find that Rousseau really is the first real modern conservative IMHO. To Rousseau https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbCqictwmLk

  • Teacher

    All very true. One cannot buy a satisfactory cup of tea anywhere now as ‘unless the kettle boiling be, filling the teapot spoils the tea’ and ‘elf n’ safety prevents anything other than lukewarm water from sad, constrained water heaters.

    I cannot believe that so much knowledge has disappeared so quickly from the national consciousness. Even my well educated contemporaries in their fifties who should know better spout political correctness as if it had been delivered on tablets from a mountain top.

    Still, I have done my bit for the future by educating my children in the old ways and the old language.

  • David davis

    James, I am old. Before I die, let me bequeath you a word. “GramscoFabiaNazis”.

    Take it. Use it; use it where you want, or even not if you don’t want to. Explain it to the Breitbart people too – that is fair – for they will want a little Anglo-European history shown to them, to really know what it’s for, what it says, and how it came from a wordforge.
    Oh, and you know what? To a first approximation, 100% of GFNs are White British. (And that includes of course North Americans and others in the Ethnic British parts of the Anglosphere.)
    The French ones, Pol Pot for example, the Russian ones, Stalin for example, and the European ones, Hitler for example, are just impotent mewling infants by comparison. All they could do was kill individual humans with tools, although admittedly in large volumes. Our lot have read Gramsci, and now know how to kill entire civilisations at the roots, without a drop of blood on their fingers.

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