Leading article

The Tories must move quickly to recruit ex-Labour voters. Here's how

The Conservatives have a stunning array of social achievements. They need to talk about them more

19 September 2015

8:00 AM

19 September 2015

8:00 AM

David Cameron might not be remembered as the best prime minister in modern British history but he will probably be remembered as the luckiest. Jeremy Corbyn’s election as leader of the Labour party is proving worse — or, for the Tories, better — than anyone could have imagined. His wrecking ball is busy destroying everything that was built by Labour’s modernisers. He does not lack authenticity, belief and passion — but his beliefs are ones which would be more at home in a 1920s plenary meeting of the Moscow Soviet than in contemporary British living rooms.

The Chancellor sees Corbyn’s leadership as a chance to further blacken Labour’s name. The Prime Minister, for his part, released a statement informing voters that Labour ‘is now a threat to our national security, our economic security and your family’s security.’

But now is not the time to bash Labour. Now is the time to make a full, comprehensive and open offer to wavering Labour voters. If Marks & Spencer were to suffer a crisis, its rivals would try to steal its customers rather than releasing ads saying that M&S was always rubbish. If a newspaper folds, others lose no time in trying their hardest to pick up any stray readers. So where are the Tory efforts to appeal to the many Labour voters? Many on the left will be inclined to resign now, for the reasons that Nick Cohen outlines.

Midway through the election campaign, Lynton Crosby intervened to stop Tory candidates attacking Liberal Democrat MPs. It was time to make overtures to Lib Dem voters, he thought. Tory activists were told to forget how much they personally dislike Vince Cable and instead be nice about him, and explain why Conservatism is the better option. His seat fell to the Tories, along with the seats of 26 other Lib Dem MPs. The love-bombing worked.


The same tactic can be applied now to Labour. Polls show that at least half of Labour voters hold views that appal Jeremy Corbyn: they support the welfare cap, which he wants to abolish, they want to relax the top rate of tax. Two thirds of them are prepared to sing the national anthem, which Corbyn wasn’t when he attended a Battle of Britain anniversary service. As a republican, he says he cannot sing ‘God Save the Queen’ with good conscience. He may be applauded for this in Islington but not by wider Labour party members. Such incidents stick in the mind more than any policy: it is 34 years since Michael Foot wore what looked like a donkey jacket on Remembrance Sunday at the Cenotaph, and that is not forgotten.

So if Labour voters take a second look at the Tories, what should they see? This question ought to dominate the preparations for the Conservative party conference next month. The Prime Minister can talk about how inequality and child poverty have both fallen under his time in Downing Street. Rather than be a ‘poverty denier’, as Corbyn absurdly claims, Cameron wants to improve the ways governments approach the issue. He is pushing through reforms that will tackle drug dependence, personal debt, educational failure and the other curses which stymie life chances. The Conservatives are the only party keen to recognise — and confront — poverty in all its dimensions.

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, should discuss the progress she has made in combating modern slavery, and her attempts to prevent the police from unfairly stopping and searching ethnic minorities.

Nicky Morgan, the Education Secretary, should talk about her party’s unrivalled faith in teachers: only the Tories trust them enough to let them set up their own schools, to free them from interference from local authority bureaucrats. She should make the point that the government has made plenty of progress in education. The results, in the free schools and academies, are nothing short of extraordinary.

Sajid Javid, the Business Secretary, should try to overcome his love of technical details and talk about the social dividends brought about by the jobs miracle. Cutting taxes for business is an end in itself, because money not confiscated by the government always helps society — through lower prices, higher wages or more jobs. Inflation is now at zero, employment stands at a record high and wages are growing at their fastest rate in six years. This, Javid should say, is the mission of today’s pro-business Conservatives: not to enrich the already well-off but to enrich society.

The Tories don’t need to move left or change their policies; they already have a stunning array of social achievements. They just need to learn to talk about these, and to express the essential optimism and faith in society that has always been the Conservative message.

Some time ago Sir Keith Joseph contrasted the ‘middle ground’ of Westminster politics with the ‘common ground’ that a political party shares with its voters. As Labour continues its self-immolation, the Tories must now fight for this common ground and seek to claim it for a generation.

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Show comments
  • Timo Okello

    Hmm….the fear mongers are out in force. I haven’t seen anything particularly wrong with Mr. Corbyn. I have, however, seen a lot of things wrong with the Tories led by Cameron.
    If the author things austerity is good a thing then he must be living a very good life. But for the little man, austerity isn’t an option s/he would willfully choose.
    Bedroom tax is such a terrible idea no matter who you talk to. I wouldn’t be praising the Tories much for such a terrible policy.
    Privatization of the Public sector such as the NHS, Royal Mail, etc isn’t a good idea either. Hospitals and healthcare in the hands of the greedy is a very bad idea. And god forbid they go to any Americans because that would be the end of civilization for those in Britain….hopefully Scotland gets a second chance at referendum and depart from the forced Union.
    Stagnant wages while MPs are voting to increase their pay is pathetic to say the least. But that’s what the elites want: the poor who can sweep their houses while they are busy molesting young boys and girls in their rented apartments in London.

    • Skyeward

      I’m not feeling well, I get into my doctor by tomorrow at the latest or a high quality urgent care doctor today. I need surgery, how does next Tuesday sound? Diagnosed with a rare form of cancer – cutting edge treatments at the University of Wisconsin and other research hospitals leave me with an excellent prognosis. And the WSJ told us this week another 8 million Americans are now insured. We are far from perfect but we at least possess the will and ability to course correct – do you?

      • alexw

        Yes and the USA spends more than double the UK does on its healthcare per capita ($9100 vs $3600). Frankly, relative to the amount spent US healthcare outcomes are appalling. Now I’ll agree the British system isn’t perfect but it is vastly superior to the US one.

        • notme3

          Actually the outcomes for those that have insurance far outweighs anything you get here, on all and every front. Cancer rates? If a US state had cancer survival rates as poor as those with the NHS, there would be a riot.

          There are many things wrong with the various different types of medical care provided across the US, but dont pretend that it is universally awful. It isnt.

          The level of care you get at GP level is far better than here. You maybe dont realise just how poor our primary level care is, because you havent experienced it elsewhere.

          • alexw

            And you have answered points I did not make. I said healthcare in the US RELATIVE to the amount spent is appalling and it is.

            Oh and I’ve lived both in the US and UK so I know how both systems work. The horror stories I would hear about health care bills running to hundreds of thousands of dollars, and how it forced them to sell their homes and go into bankruptcy……

          • Caractacus

            Not sure what your point is though. The US health care outcomes are relatively very very good. You’re making them sound awful because the US pays a lot more for it’s healthcare. It’s a poor comparison.

          • alexw

            My point is just about any country can achieve high healthcare outcomes if they bung enough money at the task. Thus the aim is not to just achieve high healthcare outcomes, but to achieve that in as efficient manner as possible. The US completely and utterly fails at this. Think of it this way, if the US more than halved its healthcare spending (hence to what the UK spends), would its outcomes still be better than ours or would they be much much worse?

    • colchar

      If you don’t see anything particularly wrong with Corbyn then there is no reasoning with you.

      • robertsonjames

        How dare you, sir. Timo knows that supporting the IRA, Hamas, Hezbollah and the Argentine claim to the Falklands, while admiring the intellectually and morally bankrupt doctrines of Karl Marx and pursuing state ownership and a command economy in Britain, is just mainstream political fare to which no reasonable person could possibly object.

        Amusingly, Corbyn, unlike Timo, will be standing candidates for election in marginal seats across Middle England, and so will be learning rather more quickly that there’s a slight problem with that particular platform.

        • Timo Okello

          I see your point.
          The two major parties – Labour and Tory – have been playing the same politics for sometime now. It is beginning to seem as though Britain gets some of its policy briefings from the Americans….nothing wrong with that as long as it is in the interest of the greater population and not a few rich elites.
          And if a Corbyn comes around everyone is surprised how a scruffy looking guy who is not in the elite club is able to garner such support to win the leadership of a major party.
          So my friend, lets face the fact that the majority of the people are disillusioned by the politics of Britain’s major parties.

          • Caractacus

            Yes, mainstream politics are boring and disillusioning. But they tend to work.

          • Damon

            Indeed Caractacus, but it’s no use explaining that to the tin-foil hatted brigade.
            Oh, hang on, an article on the ‘net says that the Bilderberg group is plotting to kidnap my hamster. Later… .

          • Jaria1

            The support comes from the far left who lost Miliband and have gained Corbyn.
            Corbyn admires Putin , is that the type of gvt you seek?
            Its not the one the British do.
            Strange you are having such a bad time here when there are so many in this world that would gladly swap places with you

        • George_Arseborne

          Robot

      • Bertie

        If he doesnt see anything wrong with Corbyn then he is either an idiot, or as much as quisling as Corbybn.

        Financially illiterate as well I’d wager. As most Corbynomics followers are.

        • Ralph

          You forget that there are some people who will vote Labour whoever their candidate is or if the party locally allowed by inaction or worse children to be molested on a large scale.

    • alexw

      And that is before the next economic crash hits us. All the media is now warning us about it and the signs are pretty clear that its not too far away.

      Only today the BoE is saying that interest rates may need to go negative.

      The spectator can post all the propaganda they want that things are nice and rosy (along with the DT) but the public isn’t buying it. Come the crash Corbyn will get huge support.

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        The difference between Corbyn and Milliband is that the former is offering an alternative vision to austerity, one that many leading economists think is actually worth the paper it’s written on. He will have a problem communicating it to the public, with the media all squarely against him, but at least there’s something there.

        • Jaria1

          We saw a sample of those economists that approve of Corbyns economics.
          If you were impressed . Press comment wasnt.
          It went on to say if you want twelve different opinions asked twelve economists.
          These compliments you expect us to be impressed with are meant for his left wing fans who are ultra tribal and want to believe what he says so desperately they will believe anything.
          Corbyns ideas are meant to persuade the less intelligent voter that we can get our finances back on the rails with no pain. Brown said exactly the same if younrecall.

          • alexw

            You mean the multiple nobel prize winners who generally support anti-austerity economics?

            Paul Krugman, Amartya Sen, and Joseph Stiglitz?

            I think you will find the vast majority of economists are anti-austerity (and they are) and certainly most of the top tier ones. And yes you can get finances back on track with little pain. Pain is a symptom of something going wrong. Pain is a way of telling you that what you are doing is hurtful and should stop doing it not that you should carry on.

            Now if you actually want to learn something about economics instead of just resorting to tribalism I suggest you read my posts on this thread –
            https://spectator.com.au/features/9636042/perhaps-what-was-needed-was-to-tip-the-whole-thing-over-jon-cruddas-on-jeremy-corbyn-and-labours-future/

          • Jaria1

            Not interested in proaganda thanks especially someonev crazed enough to admire Corbyn. The person put there by the far right and fellow travellers what on earth coukd anyone learn apart from if you want to undo all the good work thats put us in a position where we are the only country people want to come and live.
            I agree with Andrew Neil when someone tried to win an arguement with him by quoting these academics. He said he was talking about countries not individuals. Btw Gordon Brown the one that saved the world was an academic.
            Go and peddle your left wing rubbish where its appreciated like Huffington post.it only insults peoples intelligence on this board

          • alexw

            Thanks for the laugh. Its obvious you have no clue and are a tory true believer. You are in for a real shock when Osbornes economic mirage comes off the rails.

            Oh and FYI if you are going to insult others for being low intelligence voters you should make sure your spelling and grammar are not so awful.

          • Jaria1

            So in scraping the barrell you have to reesort to spelling and grammar. Send some sensible posts and ill spend more time on them at the moment they are barely worth replying to .
            Your right I would be shocked whereas I expect Corbyn to cock things up and if you choose to try and convince us that Corbyn is anything but a frustrated old leftie looking to avenge his 30 years of being ignored
            If you think its an insult to call Corbyns supporters of low intelligence you are mistaken . Im just stating an kbvious fact

          • alexw

            It is an insult, and its not an obvious fact given my background is a PhD in the hard sciences, coupled with multiple publications in my specialism.

            Also I am not going to repost everything here that I did in another thread. If you want to read “sensible” posts you are welcome to read the posts on the link I gave you.

          • Jaria1

            Your background as an academic would tell me you know about your subject but little else about the rest of thhe world aand this does confirm your ignorance and blindness of this subject which is obviously alien.
            For example would your phd be of more value than your heroes 30 years experience in Parliament. Stick to your specialism where you would or might know more than others.
            Clearly giving Corbyn high marks tells me you know little on this subject.
            I take it what you call sensible posts would be your own posts. In the real world its left to others to mark ones own paper.. Again im afraid you demonstrate your ignorance of the University of life.

          • alexw

            Oh I know lots about the rest of the world and I know a lot about economics. Our economy is in truly dire shape and idiots (and I’m not trying to be insulting) like yourself who just follow party lines don’t help.

            Watch this Oxford University lecture on our economic situation for instance, then come back to me and tell me you think everything is rosy and that Osborne is not going to destroy our economy.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVU0LpZrLlk

          • Jaria1

            If you know a lot about the rest of the world you have yet to demonstrate ite it and I doubt very much if your Phd and hard sciences would be of much assistance to you on this board.
            However as always you make my point for me. Knowing the subject under discussion or any subject is acquired by listening and reading people who really do know their subject.
            Some can be misled by bad and misguided advice which leads them to pass it on as their opinion.
            Im like many other voters who would vote for the Conservative party to prevent the Labour party from once again messing things up with their Socialist programmes that have failed us each time they have been entrusted with the running of this country.
            You exhort others to read your self assessed words of wisdom but it seems a good idea if you replied to what was written.
            This country still has a long way to go and its economy is vulnerable but its moving in the right direction once again and that is clearly seen when comparing it with every other WesternDemocracy . The US being a super poeer being a different case..
            No one can claim to know a lot about economicsvand support Corbyn at the same time.
            So you see even your phd hasnt helped you here because you constantly read what im saying mistakenly.
            I like the bit about not being insulting like idiots like me.
            Do youbstudy humour as well

          • alexw

            Come back to me when you have watched the video I linked so that you have some clue on what you are talking about, rather than simply regurgitating nonsense memes. Because that in truth is all you are doing.

          • Jaria1

            Come back to me when you have read tomorrows Independant showing droves of Labour voters have switched over to Conservatives. Thanks to you hero.
            Dont do links if youve got something to say then pist it thats what people do on this board.
            Oxford and Cambridge have always been Socialists until the grow up having seen what the outside world is like

          • alexw

            I give up. I’m talking to a tory fanatic. Evidence won’t sway you. You have belief that is what is important. Goodnight.

          • Jaria1

            Good. How much did that phd cost . You really havnt a clue on your subject have you? Arnt you supposed to form your conclusions by listening from what others say.
            At what time during these exchanges did you experience that awful feeling that you were on the losing side.
            Your increasing incherency seems to have reached its peak in calling me a Tory fanatic and only believe what I say is correct. This after i have said that I voted Tory like many others to ensure that a left wing Miliband in hock to the Unions and dependent on SNP. Support. You didnt understand what hthat was telling you did you.
            Now ms phd you should be able to recognise you are accusing me of being exactly what you are. You are besotted by this bitter Communist , panting to seek revenge on those that ignored him for 30 years.
            You say I ignore evidence yet once again ignore the dangers of Socialising the UK . Well again I invite you to read the comments on the polls carried out by the Indepedent tomorrows edition.
            Finally i am ignoring evidence by not reading your links , i never read links im hear to read posters opinions and whilst we are at it. Im ignoring opinion not evidence..
            You should becaware of the difference phd or not.

        • alexw

          Agreed. There are exceedingly few nations now that believe in austerity. Due to Osbornes idiocy we are one of the few that does. Hopefully now that there is another person with high media exposure willing to speak out the general public will learn the truth. Osborne truly needs to rot in hell for the damage he has caused.

          • Jaria1

            Is it you speaking or your left wing beliefs.
            Of course you wouldnt agree with people doing their part in the recovery . You want yhe State to do it? Weve seen what that brings us. On the other hand Osborne and the Treasury have put the UK. Into a position which most envy..
            Socialism doesnt work and never will .btw this other person you refer to . Surely you are not thinking of Corbyn are you?
            What experience has he had in high finance? Most of the time hes spent in Parliament hes been ignored and we see the result by his petty actions.

        • alexw

          Here is a video you may want to watch on our economic situation. Its a lecture from oxford university school of business and details how truly dire our situation is. It illustrates how appallingly Cameron and Osborne are running our economy and nation.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVU0LpZrLlk

        • Tamerlane

          ‘…many leading economists think is actually worth the paper it’s written on.’ Name one.

          • red2black

            http://labourlist.org/2015/08/economists-back-jeremy-corbyns-anti-austerity-policies/
            David Blanchflower Bruce V, Rauner Professor of Economics Dartmouth and Stirling, Ex-member of the MPC
            Mariana Mazzucato, Professor, Sussex
            Grazia Ietto-Gillies, Emeritus Professor, London South Bank University
            Malcolm Walker, Emeritus Professor, Leeds
            Robert Wade, Professor, LSE
            Michael Burke, economist
            Steve Keen, Professor, Kingston
            Victoria Chick, emeritus professor, UCL
            Anna Coote, NEF personal capacity
            Ozlem Onaran, Professor, Greenwich
            Andrew Cumbers, Professor, Glasgow
            Tina Roberts, economist
            Dr Suzanne J. Konzelmann, Birkbeck,
            Tanweer Ali, lecturer, New York
            John Weeks, Professor, SOAS
            Marco Veronese Passarella, lecturer, Leeds
            Dr Judith Heyer, Emeritus Fellow, Somerville College, Oxford
            Dr Jerome De-Henau, Senior Lecturer, Open University.
            Stefano Lucarelli, Professor, Bergamo
            Paul Hudson, Formerly Universität Wissemburg-Halle
            Mario Seccareccia, Professor, Ottawa
            Dr Pritam Singh, Professor, Oxford Brookes
            Arturo Hermann, Senior research fellow at Istat, Rome
            Dr John Roberts, Brunel
            Cyrus Bina, Professor, Minnesota
            Alan Freeman, retired former economist
            George Irvin, Professor, SOAS
            Susan Pashkoff, economist
            Radhika Desai, Professor, Manitoba
            Diego Sánchez-Ancochea. Associate Professor, Oxford
            Guglielmo Forges Davanzati, Associate Professor, Salento
            Jeanette Findlay, Senior Lecturer, Glasgow
            Raphael Kaplinsky, Emeritus Professor, Open University
            John Ross, Socialist Economic Bulletin
            Steven Hail, Adjunct Lecturer, Adelaide
            Louis-Philippe Rochon, Associate Professor, Laurentian
            Hilary Wainwright, editor, Red Pepper
            Arturo Hermann, senior researcher, ISAE, Rome
            Joshua Ryan-Collins, NEF personal capacity
            James Medway, lecturer City University
            Alberto Paloni, professor, Glasgow
            Dr Mary Roberton, Leeds

          • Tamerlane

            Real economists not pinko academics. Wheat not chaff. Nice try though. straight from Labour List…yeah…that’s impartial…LOL!

          • red2black

            Not that it really interests me either way, but I imagine the list of names would be the same, whatever the source. I don’t know anything about anyone on the list, and I’ve no connection with any political party.
            I very much doubt that any list of economists, or of people from any other discipline for that matter, presented as support by any political party, could, or would, claim to be, impartial.

          • Tamerlane

            Oh they would claim to be impartial, you can be sure of that.

          • red2black

            If I hear it from them, I’ll let you know.

      • Jaria1

        Which way do you want it? All the media are warning us about it or The Spectator are saying everything is rosy! You cant have both.
        The fact is everything in the UK is doing better than expected but a lot of the rest of the world is unstable unlike last time despite Darlings warnings we went on a spending spree.
        As was shown at the election it is the Tories that the public trust to look after the countys finances..
        My guess is that with Milibands Labour party and their old failed fron bench you are looking for an anti Tory party.. Telling everyone how good Corbyn is will be will only embarrass you later when his Fred Karnos circus implodes

      • The End

        By why would he get “huge support”? If there’s another crash Corbyn and Labour will still be seen as inept on the economy, and who on earth would trust him to deal with a crisis? He has no leadership credentials or experience whatsoever. If there is another crash, in my view it would be of no great benefit to anyone politically, but surely the Tories could argue that at least government financial liabilities have been reduced since 2010 and also the electorate (as opposed to Labour members) are more aware of global factors than they were in 2008. Anyone with half a brain knows that the Tories are the only ones with any sense of economic responsibility.

    • Jaria1

      There are a few that share your opinion and need explanations
      It is of course the end result that matters and its my opinion.n
      Theres plenty of nor

      • Jaria1

        Sorry had to rush off
        Bedroom tax has been turned by the left into a propaganda excercise by you lot.
        Its not a tax its an incentive for older families that no longer need the room to downsize. Its an excellent idea trashed by selfish party politics.
        Ive told you to concentrate on who caused these problems not the ones who as usual are left to clear up the mess ( again)
        Again you chose to overlook inconvenient facts . Theres not enough room here to explain about the NHS. But if you can bear to read about not only how much Labour did privatise the NHS and totally made a mess of re organising and refinancing . Dont you remember Mandlesons efforts to sell off the Royal Mail?,the Tories didnt have to worry about Unions reaction because they eere not their paymasters.
        Ive never read such a misinformed post Little wonder you admire Corbyn

        • Mara Naile-Akim

          Like most of your ideas, it’s great in theory. Absolutely fantastic.

          Problem is, in practice it won’t work. Bedroom tax would only ever be viable if there was a supply of smaller flats for those people to move to. There is not.

          • Jaria1

            My ideas ? Im translating the idea for those who dismiss it for political reasons.
            There might not be these small units at the moment but they would be cheaper and easier to build to considef if a plot did become available.

          • MrSonicAdvance

            Or you get a lodger in to the bedroom you’re not using. The rent would meet the tax and you’d earn money on top. There’s even tax benefits to it.

          • red2black

            “Pack ’em in, you peasants!”

    • global city

      Why should people not fear a mental hard left extremist government? Every one of them have failed, most having first descended into cruelty and oppression.

    • Don Kenner

      Yes, because everyone who disagrees with you, or sees a downside to the policies of Labour, is a “fear monger.” Molesting children? Are you referring to Rotherham?

      • Mary Ann

        What you are talking about is a scared local authority afraid of being seen as racist, the cure it not to judge people by their race or skin colour then we don’t have to fear being called racists.

        • vieuxceps2

          What an extraordinary opinion to hold. Hundreds of children are abused while a council does nothing for fear of being seen as racist. Conclusion? It’s our fault for being racist.And people worry about Corbyn’s sanity…..

    • Ned Costello

      “I haven’t seen anything particularly wrong with Mr. Corbyn”

      You should have stopped right there frankly.

      The rest of you post is just delusional, head-in-the-sand, predictable,student-union level, lefty boilerplate.
      Fail.

      • Timo Okello

        Well, not quite a fail since you had to respond

    • Damon

      “Privatization of the public sector such as the NHS… .”
      You mean, as Tony Blair did?
      “And God forbid they go to any Americans because that would be the end of civilization for those in Britain… .”
      Steering clear of hyperbole, then? Good for you.
      “[H]opefully Scotland gets a second chance at referendum and departs from the forced Union.”
      Over my dead body, and over those of the many patriots, north and south, who love Britain and identify as British.

    • Jaria1

      Dont mislead the bedroom tax is a removal of a benefit to encourage people with large houses to down size.
      It was Labour that pricatised the NHS , you mislead again.
      Mandleson tried hard to get the aroyal Mail privatised
      Both Scotland and the rest of the UK are better off together. The Scots voted for it ., the SNP are blackmailing the rest of the UK for political advantage. Had the Scots voted for independence they would have been in big trouuble with the drop in oil.
      HoC is a microcosm of the rest of the UK or even the world and despite your grubby efforts is not confined to just one political party.
      You must know how inaccurate your accusations are therefore the question arises as to whats behind you writing such inaccurate nonsense

  • Mara Naile-Akim

    Why is this dated September the 19th?

    The problem is, it’s kinda hard to convince a voter who is living worse now than in 2010 that life has somehow got better under the Tories. Milliband was offering essentially the same as the conservatives, with very minor differences, so was Clegg. And with billions of cuts coming, things ain’t going to improve by 2020. You can explain all you like how poverty got better under the Tories and the economy improved, but to people who are struggling to afford their fuel bills and seeing the prices rising and their wages not rising, that explanation will ring very hollow. So in the end the Tories will resort to type – scaremongering, smears and negative campaigning, the aim will be to show how bad Corbyn is, not to say what’s good about them.

    • Precambrian

      It will be published in the paper version of the Speccy tomorrow; hence “19th”.

      • Leftyliesrefuted

        Good of you to explain to her. Lefties do seem to have great difficulty comprehending numbers.

        😉

    • Jaria1

      All depends how intelligent the person is.
      Remember how long it took us to recover from the war?
      Tell your worker friend that the flags are flying in the right direction now.
      The press tell us that real wages have jncreased by 2.7% and will accelerate rapidly by 2017,
      You might try telling him who were responsible for the State of the Economy which caused the sacrifices to be made

      • Mara Naile-Akim

        the 2.7% is an average increase, that’s possibly weighted by massive increases at the top. The problem is, if Corbyn persuades people that he can get them out of crisis without making those ‘sacrifices’ (which the rich and powerful somehow never have to make), he will do well. And one could point to Clem Attlee, who managed the ‘recovery from the war’ part very well indeed, so well that he pushed the whole political spectrum leftwards, which led to the post-war consensus where the Tories followed the sort of agenda that now would be seen as very left of centre.

        • Jaria1

          Youd best read up on it. You will find it refers to the lowest paid. Youll be sorry to hear that the private sector will still lag behind the public sector but it tells us that it wont be until 2017 before we reach parity with pre crash values.
          Look im not here to argue with you about what you see as the near miracles the left achieved an will avpchieve under corbyn.
          we would be far too far apart to know where to start.
          I have witnessec the improvement in the countrys standing and what Corbyn has in mind for the Country

    • Jaria1

      And you are trying to tell us that Corbyns will be better.
      Posters on this board should not be expected to be exposed to such rubbish

  • 4thaugust1932

    “Diverse society will fail” –Putnam;
    Let black Police deal with black Culprits;
    http://www.boston.com/news/globe/ideas/articles/2007/08/05/the_downside_of_diversity/

    • red2black

      Diverse society will fail? Singapore’s supposed to be doing OK.

  • douglas redmayne

    UKIP should make the offer to fight against immigration, Islamification and dilution of our national culture. If enough Labour voters in the north thought UKIP could beat the Tories then that is where they would go.

    • Mary Ann

      Or to put it another way, ukip should stir up racial hatred, they have already been doing that. Some people can see through them.

      As for our national culture, if it is so pathetic that immigration can ruin it then it’s not worth keeping in the first place, personally I hold our ‘national culture’ in higher esteem than you do.

      • Jaria1

        Thats not the way it works . Its a large proportion of the immigrants that will not integrate into the British way of life that change the culture of the country.

        • red2black

          Most of them will never earn enough to become tax evaders.

          • Jaria1

            You arnt forgetting the other taxes we pay are you?

          • red2black

            Tax evasion seems to be part of the British way of life.

          • Jaria1

            From that remark I must assume your life has never been interested in what happens in the rest of the World

          • red2black

            On the contrary, I find what happens in the rest of the world very interesting, but often difficult to understand.

          • Jaria1

            Well i dont agree and for a start suggest you find out more about how tax payers in the US view their tax set up.
            Im not surprised we disagree having looked at your profile.
            Anyhow ive said all I need to on the subject

          • red2black

            I have a friend who lived in New York State, but worked in New Jersey. He said by the time they’d finished, he paid more tax in America than he did over here (UK). I’ll take a stab at it and say people don’t like having to pay taxes. Thanks for your replies.

      • Jeff Thompson

        Racist Scum.

    • Jaria1

      I think the Tories and UKIP could live together but Corbyns Labour and UKIP is a no no.

      • Mary Ann

        A bit insulting to the Tories.

        • Jaria1

          When you think how many Including two Tory MPs joined UKIP. Maybe not.
          Farage has seen he was going too far. Dont forget they dont want to alienate themselves too much from the voters. Look at Corbyns watering down of his more strident policies.

        • Bertie

          Not as insulting as it is to Ukip frankly.

  • new_number_2

    “His wrecking ball is busy destroying everything that was built by Labour’s modernisers.”

    Despite being in control of Labour for decades, the Labour Right is apparently never responsible for any of Labour’s misfortunes. The Labour Left, which has hardly any influence in all this time is somehow responsible for anything and everything that ever goes wrong for Labour.

    • Jaria1

      Thats a bit difficult to swallow as its the left that have been funding the Labour party and as you know he who pays the piper etc

      • red2black

        Union membership is at an all time low, so perhaps their funding of the Labour Party is as well?

        • Jaria1

          This is why they are having to rely on UNITE as much as they do.Corbyn shows his gratitude by promising to give them back the old powers they used to disrupt the country once again.

          • red2black

            Workers in Unions do tend to have far better pay and conditions than those who aren’t in Unions.

          • Jaria1

            No doubt about that until you work out why. Is it fair to hold the general public to ransom to get an unfair advantage. It leads to higher and higher wages which is fine until you realise that you can send firms bust and then where are you!
            A good example would be train drivers and junior doctors. The former

          • Jaria1

            Ie train driver after a few months gets twice that of a junior doctor after years of training.!
            The Unions did a good job originally stopping the employers taking advantage but now the shoe is on the other foot thats why the gvt . Are taking measures to stop Union leaders using their positions for political purposes

          • red2black

            Stopping the employers taking advantage is political, just as much as allowing them to is.

  • 1357924680

    “Theresa May, the Home Secretary, should discuss her attempts to prevent the police
    from unfairly stopping and searching ethnic minorities.”

    Considering the consequent rise in violent crime and knife possession (amid a backdrop of general crime decrease) I think stopping such tactics is actually unfair on the rest of us.

    • Jaria1

      The explanation is simple and was given by an ex Met commisioner.
      You must try to take race out of the problem
      Those that are chosen are ones that are looking suspicious and loitering around the street.
      These people would be those that have no job to go to and fall into bad practices and yes they happen to be black and the commissioner told us that 99% were ethnics.
      On those figures just who is stupid enough to ignore that they be up to no good.
      Im getting more and more annoyed at that Chakrabati women from amnesty who interferes and waters down the capabilities of our defence forces.
      If the police have intervened in six advanced plots to commit crimes that if successful would result in large loss of life. We are as good as if we are at war
      These people should therefore not be tolerated

      • Mary Ann

        It doesn’t help that it is twice as difficult to get an interview from a CV if your name sounds as if you are black.

        • Jaria1

          Im sorry to have to say that what you say is probably correct but really great improvements have taken place when compared with even 20 years ago.
          The youth of today also seems less predjudiced and of course if your name implies you are British and White dont bother applying for a job with the BBC :).
          To be honest and although I spent my youth in the city ive spent my life in a rural community where ive seen no problems . My youngsters im pleased to say dont differentiate at all, colour is not an issue.

          • Mary Ann

            The BBC has lots of white British employees.

          • Jaria1

            Yes Mary Ann

  • Tamerlane

    Oh it’s all ‘tomaatow’ ‘tomayto’ Miliband or Corbyn the maths hasn’t changed and isn’t going to come 2020. It’s still a leftie Labour-SNP alliance with England held to ransom by Sturgeon et al whilst middle income earners in marginals like Worcester watch their interest rates rocket and savings evaporate in a blaze of inflation or it’s vote Tory and live some of your aspirations, not all, but some. So Tory it is. Relax, go to Whites or Boodles or wherever it is the Fraser Nelsons, Matthew D’Anconas and Anne Applebaums of this world spend their time and have a classic Vesper, on the rocks of course.

    • Mara Naile-Akim

      Middle-income earners are finding it it tough to buy a house before 40 and afford a child before 35. They are seeing prices rise and wages fail to keep up. They are seeing public services cut and cut.

      And what are the Tories offering? Aspirations? What do I eat that with for dinner? Or maybe my car can run on it?

      But yeah, the Tories will talk about the horrible Scots (the Sun will probably run headlines in Scotland telling people to vote the SNP to keep out the Tories and in England to vote the Tories to keep out the SNP), the horrible communists, and try to scare people.

      • Tamerlane

        You in Worcester? Basildon? Nope, didn’t think so,I’ll be you couldn’t even find them on a map, move on from the London bubble.

    • The Hoxton Hockler

      Twat.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      Ah yes, the aspiration of losing your job and being told you’re evil, while the local hospital closes.

      Rather than allow a functional economy.

      • Tamerlane

        Blah blah blah…

        • Leon Wolfeson

          And you can’t disagree. Right.

  • The Dybbuk

    Odd, that for all these lights hidden under the Tory bushel mentioned here only 24% of the electorate chose to be suitably illuminated in May. Corbyn may or may not be the disaster that you hope for, only the voters will can tell us, but Cameron and his crew are hardly doing things that are any more attractive than the apparently written off Labour Party.

    Equally odd that you are not trumpeting the blazing success that is the Tory Immigration policy. But then that would mean acknowledging the existence of a large number of tories now more at home in Ukip.

    • Jaria1

      Price of success ! Everyone wants to come where the jobs are to be found.
      Then despite Blairs Education education education we have been left with a huge skill shortage so it has to be imported.For the first time imports from the EU. Which we cant refuse out number those from the rest of the world,
      If they arnt doing better then the country certainly is.

  • Gordon
  • TimeMoneyWorld

    The Labour Party under Blair was the party of Wars of Aggression – crimes as per the UN Charter.
    It was a party of spin and reckless borrowing, which on leaving power anounced that there is no money left in the kitty.

    Bladers put on Nuremberg style trial for their crimes.

    But it’s not just the Labour Party.
    Pair’s Labour Party should have been disbanded as a criminal organization, and its leaders put on Nuremberg style trial for their crimes.

    But it’s not just the Labour Party.
    Party Politics itself has come to the end of its useful life.

    Britain needs HONEST and COMPETENT GOVERNMENT not ideological political demagogues with unlimited powers allowing them to get away with any crime.

    We do not need “politicians”.
    We need HONEST and COMPETENT government officials:
    hired for pay,
    fired if fail,
    jailed if misbehave.

    There is no justification for anybody to be above the law and be “judged only by history”, as Tony Blair believes he should be judged.

    • Mary Ann

      The Tories voted for the wars as well. Blair said he would be judged by God, as there is no god Blair get’s of scot free.

      • TimeMoneyWorld

        You are right that the Tories voted for the wars as well, which shows that they are just as criminally minded as Blair.

        But Blair gets off scott free, not because of his professed beliefs, or your lack of them, but because of the absense of a workable system of Internaltional Law and inability of the British Leagal System to deal with this type of criminality.

        It could not even bring to justice the alleged 20 homicidal paedophiles at the top of the British Establishment, although their existence was known to the police for over 30 years.

        And none of the political parties craving to be in government, see such impotence of the Iternational and British Law as an abnormality. Because they enjoy their impunity.

        They just keep posing and posturing and arguing about their “left-righ-center” ideologies.

        Is any of them fit to govern?

  • Jon Newman

    Turn to the dark side and we can rule the galaxy together.

    Fuck the Tories. You’re the lowest of the low. If I had a choice between eating dog shit and shaking Cameron’s hand I choose to eat dog shit.

    • red2black

      Eating dog shit seems self-defeating because your political enemies would enjoy watching you do it. Still, better to volunteer than be forced to do it.

  • Old Fox

    Most of this is unexceptionable – although I take 1357’s point about stop and search. However, one thing Cameron must not on any account do – or even attempt to do – is stitch up the referendum. Not only would this certainly split the party but it would maintain our subservience to an increasingly crazy and irrelevant left-international agenda. Worst of all, it would lead to serious political disturbances only a few short years from now.

    • Mary Ann

      You mean the kippers will be bad loosers. Wouldn’t be surprised.

      • Jeff Thompson

        What s a “looser”, you Retard?

  • Mr. Krullebol

    “Cutting taxes for business is an end in itself, because money not confiscated by the government always helps society — through lower prices, higher wages or more jobs.”

    Such a joke, as if taxes disappear into thin air . . . . . an argument not worthy of a quality publication . . .better leave this kind of bs to the Sun .

  • SNP “AJOCKALYPSE”

    Oink…..Oink !!

  • Hmmmm…..lots of second places for UKIP in Labour seats last May….I wonder why the Speccie’s Sixth Formers have “forgotten” that?

    • Mary Ann

      There’s going to be an EU referendum before the next election. If Britain wins there will be no point in ukip continuing and if Britain looses, the ukip’s name will just look silly.

      • The_Aged_P

        Au contraire, UKIP’s electoral rise was only partly driven by the EU issue. It was far more closely linked to the fact that many voters no longer trusted the legacy parties and their media cheerleaders. Even if we leave the EU this mistrust will continue. A patriotic non socialist party that is not in the pocket of big business or the chattering classes but which also has substantial working class support is exactly what the UK will need

  • ohforheavensake

    Yep. It’ll be tough. They’ll have to go the whole hog.

  • michael

    Labour have disintegrated at GO’s left-lurching centrist grabbing pronouncement of the living wage. JC is Labour’s ‘as per usual’ retrenchment to the loony left whenever trouble strikes.

  • hereward

    We could more usefully have got an article on electoral reform and how to get a better representation in Parliament (of the votes cast ) for the people of this country . Instead we get the above . Why does the word conspiracy come to mind ?

    • Mary Ann

      This is the tory press, and there is a good chance that the Tories would not end up in power with PR. I actually think it would be very interesting to see how the main parties changed their policies to maximise their votes if the system was changed.

  • red2black

    Which payday loan company does the government use to borrow two billion quid a week in order to make ends meet? Is their interest rate comparable with others on the high street, or is the government considered less of a risk when it comes to repayment?

  • Mary Ann

    I don’t suppose that the average Labour voter gives a f… about Foot’s coat, trust a tory journalist to drag it up, the Queen Mother complimented Foot on his coat, if the Queen mum approved who are the journalists to criticize especially when they are criticizing Corbyn for not singing God save the Queen. Talk about double standards.

  • MickC

    The last thing the Conservative party needs is Blairites joining. What it needs is Conservatives..but they seem to have gone to UKIP.

    The SNP has brought honesty and passion back to politics…and just look what that has achieved in Scotland. Despite the MSM views to the contrary, it is likely Corbyn can do the same in England and Wales.

    After the spin and deceit of Major, Blair and Cameron, the voters want plain speaking, and straightforward policies.

    Like Thatcher, people may not like what she stood for, but there was little doubt as to what it was.

    Our current lot are just in it for themselves. The fact that Corbyn didn’t try to climb the greasey pole speaks volumes.

  • Des Demona

    ”The Tories must move quickly to recruit ex-Labour voters. Here’s how”

    Does it involve molesting a dead pig? I’m not sure that’s the way to go.

  • SNP “AJOCKALYPSE”

    I feel sorry for the pig.

  • SNP “AJOCKALYPSE”

    Can’t wait to hear all the pig noises at PMQs.

    • Mary Ann

      Didn’t you hear, the last PMQs were far more civilised than usual.

  • Liberanos

    The Conservative party is attractive in direct inverse ratio to the success of the Labour party. They don’t have to be any good.

  • Rob74Eroticus

    They can’t win Labour voters because they are Tory’s. UKIP on the other hand will clean up.

  • Jeff Thompson

    Oh look, The Speccy Filth pretending UKIP don’t exist again. As normal, unless they’re doing a one of their regular cowardly Hatchet Jobs.

    Let me tell you, you CCHQ Tory Morons… I live in the most working class area, of one of the most working class towns in Britain. And you’re not getting any Ex-Labour voters. Any bright enough to leave, are on the way to UKIP.

  • Allyup

    Blair knew what matters for winning elections are votes in key marginals.
    Swing voters are unlikely to be believers in either left or fight ideology so their vote is coloured by reality.
    A report by two former Labour election directors found former Labour voters turned Conservative because of distrust of Miliband and policies on the economy, taxation, welfare, union links, and immigration http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/jul/18/labour-party-voters-desertion-election.

    Corbyn will be more distrusted because his polices are further left and also include printing money and he is seen as a danger to national security. Whilst this gives a sugar rush to the left it is simultaneously an anathema to moderates. He may be that rare thing an honest politician but its policies that matter for winning elections.

    A very recent ComRes poll found that results for an election now would be very similar to GE results earlier http://comres.co.uk/polls/independent-on-sunday-sunday-mirror-september-2015-poll/
    Corbyn is new and minds are not focussed yet on what Corbyn as PM would mean.
    At the approach of 2020 the floating voter will look long and hard at what’s on offer. Moderates will see the Corbynite offer as far more risky in many areas.

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