Features Australia

Book lover’s notes

18 February 2017

9:00 AM

18 February 2017

9:00 AM

The hot days of summer inspire two impulses, a good clean up, curiously called a spring clean, and the desire to read books.

I have to admit the latter is more pleasurable than the former and the former seems to have no end and inevitably gives way to reading books.

First up is a re-read of The Road to Serfdom, the seminal work of F.A. Hayek published in 1944. Hayek ran counter to the socialist academic class which was very much in the ascendancy and he suffered for daring to write this book for the very reason that it is comprehensible to readers. Indeed he dedicates the book ‘to the socialists of all parties’.

Although awarded the Nobel Prize in economics in 1974, he only received rightful recognition in America in 1992 when President George Bush Snr awarded Hayek the Medal of Freedom; yes, the same medal given to Vice President Joe Biden by outgoing President Obama, and it was bestowed with the following words:

One of the great thinkers of our age who explored the promise and contours of liberty…{Hayek} revolutionized the world’s intellectual and political life.

This medal is the highest United States civilian honour. Interestingly, in the light of current discussion on fake news, Hayek entitles his ninth chapter ‘The End of Truth’.

Hayek sets out clearly the difference between individualism and collectivism, of which socialism is a ‘species of that genus’.

To put it plainly, individualism means that every individual matters and should be free to have the opportunity to achieve their maximum potential. This includes everyone: the brightest, the ordinary, the disabled and disadvantaged, and each of us has a moral obligation to reach out to assist our neighbour have that opportunity.

Collectivism means the individual can be sacrificed to the collective. In Hayek’s words:

Socialism is a species of collectivism and that therefore everything that is true of collectivism as such must apply to socialism.


Intellectual socialism was promoted by George Bernard Shaw, who founded the Fabian Society which portrayed socialism as the wolf in sheep’s clothing. Shaw advocated that those who consume more than they produce, and do not adequately contribute in the state’s eyes, should not be supported but eliminated humanely without pain. He said there should be ‘an appeal to chemists to discover a humane gas that will kill instantly and painlessly… humane but not cruel’.

These are the very words echoed by Eichmann at his trial. Millions of Jews and others gassed to death in the National Socialists’ gas chambers he claimed died painlessly and humanely.

Shaw supported, indeed promoted, Russian communism. Stalin’s international socialism killed 10 million Ukrainians by forcing them to grow food and then seizing that food, leaving these people to starve – with mothers feeding their children with human flesh.

Shaw also supported Hitler who murdered 6 million Jews and others in the gas chambers. He only disagreed with Hitler over who should be killed. He thought the killing should be on the basis of class rather than race.

Hitler euthanised others he decided did not add to Germany’s societal good, including the disabled and mentally disturbed, and homosexuals and gypsies.

When Czech soldiers assassinated the Butcher of Prague, Reinhardt Heydrick, Hitler’s retaliation was vicious. The entire inhabitants of two towns were annihilated and the interrogation of the boy who gave up the Czech soldiers included torture and showing him the head of his mother in a bucket.

Mao Tse-tung’s China gave us mass socialism, where his appalling central planning and Great Leap Forward resulted in the worst man-made famine in history, with more than 40 million dying of hunger, and evidence of cannibalism. His ‘one child’ population policy left baby girls dead in the gutter.

I have a mission to see Australia protected from socialism. I have a passion to make Australians aware of the ravages of socialism, and what, if unleashed, it would do to our country.

Already socialist forces are at work, as we can see in the following:

– the dumbing down of education, so people are easier to rule. Politically correct teaching does not permit children to question or challenge or express a differing point of view.

– the discrediting and undermining of the concept of family, a bulwark against socialism, with parental authority and guidance being taken over by the state using tools such as gender fluidity, and the Safe Schools Program.

– advocating to replace equality of opportunity with equality of outcome.

– sacrificing security of energy supply on the altar of climate change.

– working to abolish private ownership of property, as committed to by Jeremy Corbin in his recent address to the Fabian Society in the UK, and the overthrowing of capitalism as committed to by a faction of our own Greens.

– advocating open borders.

– the teachings of one Australian philosopher who advocates killing disabled children at birth because they are a drain on society. Just like George Bernard Shaw proposed, and Hitler carried out. The same man also approves of sexual relations between humans and animals so long as the animal is not harmed.

Yes, the hot summer days see climate change doomsayers predicting the end of the world. But those same summer days can be a blessing to read and gain knowledge and understanding. May I suggest two more titles? First, J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy to better understand why the USA elected President Trump. Secondly, Treason of the Heart by David Pryce-Jones and you’ll be as shocked as me by people in history, from Paine to Philby, who hated their own nations and advocated foreign ideologies. Good reading!

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