Flat White

Novavax: the good vaccine

24 November 2021

4:00 AM

24 November 2021

4:00 AM

He takes away your freedom to work. He prevents you from seeing friends and loved ones. He only lets you watch programs which distort your sense of reality and supress your independent thought. He watches and monitors everywhere you go. He threatens to keep you locked up if you don’t comply. 

And the final straw? 

He forces you to get a medical treatment that you never wanted. 

In many ways, Victoria’s relationship with Daniel Andrews resembles more of an abusive relationship than a government that is in power to serve the people. 

Victoria’s two-tiered society has witnessed the use of isolationist language and tactics to separate the vaccinated from the unvaccinated.  

Dictator Dan pushes Victorians to consider the vaccinated as superior citizens and the unvaccinated as less than helots. It must be breathing in a dangerous amount of salty ocean air at one particular holiday house in Sorrento, which is causing his judgement to rust away. 

Really representing Mulgrave there, aren’t you Andrews? 

Pushing aside the loopy tyrant’s lacking capacity to accurately represent his electorate, his forceful approach in pressuring citizens to get vaccinated has been appalling. 

Those who do not want to get vaccinated shouldn’t feel pressured to get the jab and those who are confident with the current technology, should do what’s right for them and get vaxxed. We are a free, democratic country and have the right to decide what medical procedures we consent to. 

However, for those individuals who are vaccine hesitant, there may be another option on the way.  

Other than escaping Victoria of course.

The highly anticipated Novavax vaccine may act as a kind of saviour to those with health issues who cannot take other Covid-19 vaccines which are currently on the market. Also, those who just plain and simple do not feel confident in our current variety of vaccines. 


According to the University of Sydney, the Novavax vaccine is a protein subunit vaccine (subunitbeing our traditional vaccines which contain a purified part of a pathogen which triggers an immune response). 

Alongside all other vaccines on the Australian market, Novavax does not contain any live components of Covid-19. This particular vaccine works, using synthetic nanoparticle technology which is coated with the infamous spike protein. 

Different from Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine, the ‘spike protein’ in this case is created through advanced technology, where spike proteins are constructed in a form which aims to imitate the makeup and structure of the virus. 

As a self-confessed health nut, my personal favourite aspect of the Novavax vaccine is the incredibly fascinating use of an extract from a Chilean tree to boost immune response. 

The Chilean soapbark tree is native to Chile and, interestingly, has been used in past vaccines such as shingles and malaria. 

According to Novavax, the saponin molecules found in the tree’s bark are being used to make “adjuvant, a substance that boosts the immune system”. 

Novavax also uses Matrix-M adjuvant technology which, according to Novavax, can “lower the dose of antigen required to achieve the desired immune response, which can result in fewer vaccine doses needed”. 

This suggests you might not to have to line up for your 27th Covid-19 booster shot 6 months down the track. 

And for people who don’t want a continuous stream of vaccines being injected into their bodies, it seems like a safer and more effective option. 

Novavax is clearly standing out from the crowd. With the absence of the contentious mRNA technology from Pfizer and Moderna (which has been linked to myocarditis, pericarditis, potential pregnancy and neonatal adverse eventsmenstrual changes and in some very rare but serious cases, death) and Astra Zeneca’s reputation crushing blood clotting saga, Novavax’s safety is demonstrating a higher success rate. 

In relation side effects, the decreased rate of adverse reactions is promising. In fact, this table from the New England Journal of Medicine looks at Novavax’s adverse reactions records in relation to a study. When looking at the toxicity grade (mild, moderate, severe or potentially life threatening) there is no data to suggest a potentially life threatening reaction in their study. This is incredible news in optimising the safety and confidence for Australians to get vaccinated. 

Novavax also has an incredible 96% efficacy which has been seen in their first trial. 

So I’ve hyped you up about Novavax, but when is it coming to Australia? 

The vaccine is still yet to be approved by the Australian government, but is said to be released in late 2021. 

With the TGA receiving 35,441 adverse event reports for Astra Zeneca and 23,434 for Pfizer in September of 2021, Novavax could not be coming at a better time. 

Although one can’t suggest all these reports indicate a direct link to negative vaccine outcomes, it’s important these incidents are seriously investigated and not overlooked as ‘crazed’ antivaxxers trying to stir up conspiracy. 

Everyone’s personal vaccine experience matters. 

With all this talk of vaccines, it is also important to remember that Covid-19 has a 0.1% fatality rate of Australians between the ages of 0 to 59 (without underlining health conditions), according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. 

This begs the question if we should shift our focus to adequate treatment — as well as vaccination — as a means of prevention. 

And not just talking about taking some colourful pills, but also health and nutrition education to get our population healthier to fight the virus in conjunction with the added protection of advanced medical technology. 

At the end of the day, it is up to the individual to weigh up the risks of getting vaccinated or choosing not to. 

Let’s hope that the protein-based vaccine will inspire more confidence in our community to get vaccinated, but most importantly keep people safe and ease their mind of the threat of potential medical adversities. 

Cheers to Novavax! 

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