Books

Red or Dead by David Peace - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

The last time David Peace wrote a novel about football he got his publishers sued for libel, which may help…

A Classless Society, by Alwyn W. Turner - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

The title of Alwyn W. Turner’s book could deter readers. Even the Hollywood film The Secret Lives of Dentists promised…

Paul Bowles

Tangier, by Josh Shoemake - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

This may sound a little orientalist, but Tangier has some claim to being the most foreign city in the world.…

The Good Nurse, by Charles Graeber - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

Charles Cullen, an American nurse, murdered several hundred patients by the administration in overdose of restricted drugs. Hospitals should be…

The Rainborowes, by Adrian Tinniswood - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

Adrian Tinniswood, so gifted and spirited a communicator of serious history to a wide readership, here brings a number of…

A Rogues’ Gallery, by Peter Lewis - review

24 August 2013 9:00 am

Like Mel Brooks’s character the Two Thousand-Year-Old Man, Peter Lewis has met everyone of consequence. Though he doesn’t mention being…

Philip Hensher reviews the Man Booker prize longlist

24 August 2013 9:00 am

The Man Booker prize has strong years and weak years. There have been ones when the judges have succeeded in…

The Email About Writing the Poem

24 August 2013 9:00 am

I’ve been occupying myself trying to write a long-ish poem. It’s an odd sensation writing a poem. You’re trying to…

Fairfax under fire

24 August 2013 9:00 am

What a spectacle. A Fairfax journalist flanked by a beaming James Packer, making no secret of his loathing for her…

Fairfax under fire

22 August 2013 1:00 pm

What a spectacle. A Fairfax journalist flanked by a beaming James Packer, making no secret of his loathing for her…

The Selected Letters of Willa Cather, edited by Andrew Jewell - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Richard Davenport-Hines on the tomboy from Red Cloud whose evocation of the vast, unforgiving landscape of the prairies is unrivalled

A Bright Moon for Fools, by Jasper Gibson - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Harry Christmas, the central character of this bitterly funny debut novel, is a middle- aged, overweight alcoholic, with no friends…

An Armenian Sketchbook, by Vasily Grossman - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Vasily Grossman, a Ukranian-born Jew, was a war correspondent for the Soviet army newspaper Red Star. His dispatches from the…

Migration Hotspots, by Tim Harris - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Consider for a moment the plight of the willow warbler. Russian birds of this species fly between eastern Siberia and…

Bitter Experience Has Taught Me, by Nicholas Lezard - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

What, really, is a literary education for? What’s the point of it? How, precisely, does it help when you’re another…

Decorous Confessions

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Unexpectedly, he made a sober success with his self-published book of decorous confessions. It eschewed turmoil in the bedchamber and…

As Green as Grass, by Emma Smith - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

The title, the subtitle, the author’s plain name, even the jacket’s photograph of a laughing old lady in sunglasses: none…

Marie Duplessis

The Girl Who Loved Camellias, by Julie Kavanagh - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Verdi’s La Traviata is the story of a courtesan who is redeemed when she gives up the man she loves…

Queen Victoria

The Coronation Chair and the Stone of Scone, by Warwick Rodwell - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

The Coronation Chair currently stands all spruced up, following last year’s conservation, under a crimson canopy, by the west entrance…

They Eat Horses, Don’t They?, by Piu Marie Eatwell - review

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Oh the French! Where would the Anglo publishing industry be without them? Ever since Peter Mayle first made goo-goo eyes…

Books and Arts

17 August 2013 9:00 am

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Born to rule

17 August 2013 9:00 am

Depending on how you look at it, the Chinese Communist Party is either the last non-ridiculous bastion of Marxism, an…

Born to rule

15 August 2013 1:00 pm

Depending on how you look at it, the Chinese Communist Party is either the last non-ridiculous bastion of Marxism, an…

Tudor, by Leanda de Lisle - review

10 August 2013 9:00 am

The Tudors, England’s most glamorous ruling dynasty, were self-invented parvenus, with ‘vile and barbarous’ origins, Anne Somerset reminds us

Reflections on a Metaphysical Flaneur, by Raymond Tallis - review

10 August 2013 9:00 am

There are books we read for pleasure and there are books we are paid to review. However enjoyable the books…