History

Landseer’s portrait of Queen Victoria riding in Windsor Home Park four years after the death of Prince Albert

Queen Victoria, by Matthew Dennison - review

12 October 2013 9:00 am

When Prince Albert died in 1861, aged 42, Queen Victoria, after briefly losing the use of her legs, ordered that…

A youthful portrait of the Dowager Empress

The Empress Dowager was a moderniser, not a minx. But does China care?

12 October 2013 9:00 am

For susceptible Englishmen of a certain inclination — like Sir Edmund Backhouse or George Macdonald Fraser — the Empress Dowager…

Meeting the Enemy, by Richard Van Emden; 1914, by Allan Mallinson - review

5 October 2013 9:00 am

The Great War was an obscene and futile conflict laying waste a generation and toppling emperors. Yet here are two…

Guido Fawkes to Damian McBride: Who's spinning now?

5 October 2013 9:00 am

When Gordon Brown eventually became aware that his Downing Street was about to be engulfed in the Smeargate scandal, he…

Anorexia, addiction, child-swapping — the Lake Poets would have alarmed social services

5 October 2013 9:00 am

The last time the general reader was inveigled into the domestic intensities of the Wordsworth circle was by Frances Wilson…

Colette’s France, by Jane Gilmour - review

28 September 2013 9:00 am

Richard Davenport-Hines on the charmed, dizzy world of the multi-talented Colette

English embroidery: the forgotten wonder of the medieval world

28 September 2013 9:00 am

Think of an art at which the English have excelled and I doubt you would come up with the word…

The Story of the Jews, by Simon Schama - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

The recorder of early Jewish history has two sources of evidence. One is the Bible. Its centrality was brought home…

Isaac & Isaiah, by David Caute - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

The scene is the common room of All Souls College, Oxford, in the first week of March 1963. It is…

Bizarre Cars, by Keith Ray - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

My various Oxford dictionaries define bizarre as eccentric, whimsical, odd, grotesque, fantastic, mixed in style and half-barbaric. By so many…

Royal Marriage Secrets, by John Ashdown-Hill - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

My brother Pericles Wyatt, as my father liked to say, is by blood the rightful king of England, the nephew…

Stage Blood, by Michael Blakemore - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

Stage Blood, as its title suggests, is as full of vitriol, back-stabbing and conspiracy as any Jacobean tragedy. In this…

Pine by Laura Mason; Lily, by Marcia Reiss - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

After the success of their animal series of monographs, Reaktion Books have had the clever idea of doing something similar…

Hanns and Rudolf, by Thomas Harding - review

21 September 2013 9:00 am

Confronted by this lavishly endorsed book — ‘compelling’ (David Lodge), ‘gripping’(John le Carré),‘thrilling’ (Jonathan Freedland) — I felt depressed. Two…

Why does Max Hastings have such a hatred for the British military?

14 September 2013 9:00 am

David Crane is taken aback by the particular contempt Max Hastings appears to reserve for the British at the outbreak of the first world war

The Prince of medicine, by Susan P. Mattern - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

In the first draft of the screenplay for the film Gladiator, the character to be played by Russell Crowe (‘father…

Noble Endeavours, by Miranda Seymour - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

Like Miranda Seymour, the author of this considerable work on Anglo-German relations, I was raised in a Germanophile home. I…

Narcoland, by Anabel Hernandez - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

It is by now surely beyond doubt that those governments committed to fighting the war on drugs — and on…

The Tragedy of Liberation, by Frank Dikötter - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

The historian of China Frank Dikötter has taken a sledgehammer to demolish perhaps the last remaining shibboleth of modern Chinese…

Uncle Bill, by Russell Miller - review

14 September 2013 9:00 am

Given the outcome of recent military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, it is pertinent to look for one particular quality…

Danubia, by Simon Winder - review

7 September 2013 9:00 am

The inbred Habsburg monarchs, who for centuries ruled without method over a vast, ramshackle empire, managed to leave an indelible mark on modern Europe, says Sam Leith

The Downfall of Money, by Frederick Taylor - review

7 September 2013 9:00 am

In Germany in 1923 money was losing its value so fast that the state printing works could not keep up.…

Dot Wordsworth: We've been self-whipping since 1672

7 September 2013 9:00 am

Isabel Hardman of this parish explained after last week’s government defeat that a deluded theory among the party leadership had…

The Rocks Don’t Lie, by David R. Montgomery - review

31 August 2013 9:00 am

James McConnachie finds that theology and geology have been unlikely bedfellows for centuries

Russian Roulette, by Giles Milton - review

31 August 2013 9:00 am

Had Onan not spilled his seed upon the ground, he might have invented invisible ink. The possibility had not occurred…